National Quilt Museum’s New Exhibit, ‘Distortion, From the European Patchwork Meeting,’ Showcases the Limitless Creativity of Fine Art Quilters Around the World

The National Quilt Museum (http://www.quiltmuseum.org) is thrilled to announce the exhibition of “Distortion, from the European Patchwork Meeting,” which will be on exhibit from April 7 through June 24, 2014. Every quilt in this exhibit represents one artist’s interpretation of an organizing theme, communicated through a patchwork of textiles. The quilts were first presented to the public at the European Patchwork Meeting (http://www.patchwork-europe.com), an internationally recognized gathering of quilting enthusiasts.

Butterfly or Waterlily Ensemble by Karin Pfunder. (PRNewsFoto/National Quilt Museum)

Butterfly or Waterlily Ensemble by Karin Pfunder. (PRNewsFoto/National Quilt Museum)

The contest theme at EPM 2013 was “Distortion”; artists were asked to create quilts that revealed distortion, whether of a physical object, an image, a fact or a piece of writing. Each entry had to have been made in 2012 or 2013 and must not have been publicly exhibited anywhere else. The contest was split into two categories: general and teacher. The submission guidelines only required that entries meet the broadest definition of patchwork quilting. Specifically, quilts had to consist of at least three layers, but the composition of those layers could be virtually anything.

Solo Dancer II by Eti David. (PRNewsFoto/National Quilt Museum)

Solo Dancer II by Eti David. (PRNewsFoto/National Quilt Museum)

Whereas the traditional patchwork quilt with which many people are familiar tends to embrace geometric and formal designs, today’s quilters broaden the perceived boundaries of the medium. The resulting touring “Distortion” collection demonstrates an enormous variety of mixed-media techniques. “We are honored to have this exhibit at The National Quilt Museum where thousands of Americans will get to view the extraordinary work of these European quilters,” commented European Patchwork exhibit coordinator Gul Laporte.

The Museum is the world’s largest museum devoted to quilts and fiber art. A destination for art enthusiasts worldwide, annually the Museum welcomes visitors from all 50 U.S. states and over 40 foreign countries from all corners of the globe. The Museum’s onsite and traveling exhibits are viewed by over 120,000 people per year. In addition, over 6,000 youth and adults participate in the Museum’s educational opportunities on an annual basis. The Museum is located in a 27,000-square-foot facility in historic downtown Paducah, Kentucky and its mission is to, “Advance the art of today’s quilters and fiber artists by making it accessible to new and expanding audiences worldwide.”

As their CEO Frank Bennett often states, “These are some of the most talented artists in the world and I want everyone to experience their work first-hand.” The National Quilt Museum is a two-time TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence winner. It is located in Historic Downtown Paducah Kentucky, which was recently recognized as a UNESCO Creative City.

Whereas the traditional patchwork quilt with which many people are familiar tends to embrace geometric and formal designs, today’s quilters broaden the perceived boundaries of the medium. The resulting touring “Distortion” collection demonstrates an enormous variety of mixed-media techniques. “We are honored to have this exhibit at The National Quilt Museum where thousands of Americans will get to view the extraordinary work of these European quilters,” commented European Patchwork exhibit coordinator Gul Laporte.

Distortion” is one of several can’t-miss exhibits at the National Quilt Museum this year. “Master Pieces,” “Backstitch” and “Quilts of Pat Campbell” will grace the halls of the museum at various times through summer and fall 2014. They will be the only museum in the United States to exhibit this international traveling exhibit which will also travel to art museums in Johannesburg, South Africa; Vicenza, Italy; Moscow, Russia; and Sainte-Marie-aux-Mine, France.