Thousands Join The Fight Against Pancreatic Cancer At PurpleStride New York City Walk/Run On April 12 At Prospect Park

Thousands will run and walk a 5K course to raise funds and awareness about pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, at PurpleStride New York City 2014 on April 12, 2014. Pancreatic cancer has one of the lowest survival rates of all major cancers – 73 percent die within one year of diagnosis and the five-year survival rate is just six percent. Pancreatic cancer is anticipated to move from the fourth to the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States by 2020.

PurpleStride New York City 2013

PurpleStride New York City 2013

The event will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, the national organization creating hope in a comprehensive way through research, patient support, community outreach and advocacy for a cure.  The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is the national organization creating hope in a comprehensive way through research, patient support, community outreach and advocacy for a cure. The organization is leading the way to change outcomes for people diagnosed with this devastating disease through a bold initiative — The Vision of Progress: Double the Survival for Pancreatic Cancer by 2020. Together, we can know, fight and end pancreatic cancer by intensifying our efforts to heighten awareness, raise funds for comprehensive private research, and advocate for dedicated federal research to advance early diagnostics, better treatments and increase chances of survival.

Participants have their choice of participating in the timed run or making strides during the awareness walk on a 5K course winding through Prospect Park in Brooklyn. The event will include music and family friendly festivities throughout the day.

The day will honor pancreatic cancer survivors like New York City resident Alicia Bertine. In April 2008, at the age of 23, Alicia was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. After surgery and treatment Alicia beat the cancer, but has since battled two recurrences, and is still fighting. “The most important lesson cancer teaches you is to embrace your life and joy and to do it now,” said Bertine. “I always focus on the positive and believe that what your mind can conceive, you can achieve.”

Join the fight against pancreatic cancer on April 12th at PurpleStride NYC 2014

Join the fight against pancreatic cancer on April 12th at PurpleStride NYC 2014

Participants will also be striding as a tribute to those who have passed away from the disease like Dick Myers who lost his battle with pancreatic cancer on his 66th birthday a few short months after diagnosis. Dick’s daughter Samantha, who lost her father just a month before he was to walk her down the aisle at her wedding, has since joined the fight against pancreatic cancer as Affiliate Coordinator for the New York City Affiliate of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. As Captain of “Team Myers,” Samantha will be joined by friends and family in honor of her father on event day.

We will be joining tens of thousands of people across the country that are taking part in more than 50 PurpleStride events this logo-originalyear and are proud to share one common goal – to end pancreatic cancer,” said Myers. “We are striding in honor of the more than 46,000 Americans that will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year and more than 39,000 that will die from the disease. Money raised helps fund personalized support for patients, their families and caregivers, as well as supporting research that will lead to better treatment options that will increase survival for pancreatic cancer patients.

Registration begins at 7:30 am and the event begins at 9:15 am.  To register, visitwww.purplestride.org/ny. To learn more about the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and the New York City Affiliate, visit www.pancan.org.

ALIBIS: SIGMAR POLKE 1963–2010 REVEALS THE FIVE-DECADE CAREER OF ONE OF THE MOST VORACIOUSLY EXPERIMENTAL ARTISTS OF THE 20TH CENTURY

The Large-Scale Retrospective Is the First to Encompass Polke’s Works Across All Mediums

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010, April 19–August 3, 2014

Contemporary Galleries, second floor; The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor; The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor; Projects Gallery, second floor.

Cover of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010, published by The Museum of Modern Art, 2014.

Cover of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010, published by The Museum of Modern Art, 2014.

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010 brings together the work of Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010), one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the 20th century. On view from April 19 to August 3, 2014, this retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums Polke worked in during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawings, prints, television, performance, and stained glass. Polke eluded easy categorization by masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next. Highly attuned to the distinctions between appearance and reality, he elided conventional distinctions between high and low culture, figuration and abstraction, and the heroic and the banal in works ranging in size from intimate notebooks to monumental paintings. Four gallery spaces on MoMA’s second floor are dedicated to the exhibition, which comprises over 250 works and constitutes one of the largest exhibitions ever organized at the Museum. 

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010 is organized by MoMA with Tate Modern, London. It is organized by Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director, MoMA; with Mark Godfrey, Curator of International Art, Tate Modern; and Lanka Tattersall, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA. The exhibition travels to Tate Modern from October 1, 2014, to February 8, 2015, followed by the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, in spring 2015.

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010 Sigmar Polke, German, 1941–2010 Untitled (Rorschach) (Ohne Titel (Rorschach)) c. 1999 Colored ink in bound notebook, 192 pages, each: 11 5⁄8 x 8 1⁄16″ (29.5 x 20.5 cm) Private Collection Photo: Alistair Overbruck © 2014 Estate of Sigmar Polke/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010; Sigmar Polke, German, 1941–2010, Untitled (Rorschach) (Ohne Titel (Rorschach)) c. 1999; Colored ink in bound notebook, 192 pages, each: 11 5⁄8 x 8 1⁄16″ (29.5 x 20.5 cm)
Private Collection, Photo: Alistair Overbruck
© 2014 Estate of Sigmar Polke/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Beneath Polke’s irreverent wit and promiscuous intelligence lay a deep skepticism of all authority—artistic, familial, and governmental. To understand this attitude, and the creativity that grew out of it, Polke’s biography and its setting in 20th-century European history is relevant: in 1945, near the end of World War II, his family fled Silesia (in present-day Poland) for what would soon be Soviet-occupied East Germany, from which they escaped to West Germany in 1953. Polke grew up at a time when many Germans deflected blame for the atrocities of the Nazi period with the alibi, “I didn’t see anything.”

Alibis is organized chronologically and across mediums, but begins in MoMA’s Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium with a sampling of works from across Polke’s career. The works presented in this gallery reflect Polke’s persistent questioning of how we see and what we know, and his constant experimentation with representational techniques, from the hand-painted dots of Police Pig (1986) to the monumental digital print The Hunt for the Taliban and Al Qaeda (2002), which he described as a “machine painting.” Polke’s fluid approach to images and materials and his embrace of chance as a way of undermining fixed meanings is exemplified in the selection of films in the Marron Atrium, all of which have never before been shown publicly. The artist avoided conventional narrative structures and oftendouble-exposed the film material, superimposing different layers of images. A preference for flux and a distrust of inherited categories are also evident in the way Polke questioned the distinction between high and low culture, as in Season’s Hottest Trend (2003)which mocks the art market’s reliance on rarity by making a painting out of tacky, mass-produced textiles. Polke also toyed with language, often using verbal and visual humor to make a claim while simultaneously positing its opposite—as, for example, in the painting Seeing Things as They Are (1991), whose title is reproduced on the back of a semitransparent textile so that, when standing in front of the work, one sees the words in reverse.

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010 Sigmar Polke, German, 1941–2010 Raster Drawing (Portrait of Lee Harvey Oswald) (Rasterzeichnung (Porträt Lee Harvey Oswald)) 1963 Poster paint and pencil on paper 37 5/16 × 27 1/2″ (94.8 × 69.8 cm) Private Collection Photo: Wolfgang Morell, Bonn © 2014 Estate of Sigmar Polke/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010; Sigmar Polke, German, 1941–2010
Raster Drawing (Portrait of Lee Harvey Oswald) (Rasterzeichnung (Porträt Lee Harvey Oswald))
1963, Poster paint and pencil on paper, 37 5/16 × 27 1/2″ (94.8 × 69.8 cm)
Private Collection; Photo: Wolfgang Morell, Bonn
© 2014 Estate of Sigmar Polke/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

The exhibition continues in the Marron Atrium with some of Polke’s earliest works, alongside notebooks and publications from throughout his career. Polke made most of the works in this section in his twenties, while a student at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, an influential art school where many of the major German artists of his generation studied. For this generation, the bravado of Pop art, which went hand in hand with the spread of American culture, was both a fascination and a target. By adopting an adamantly clumsy approach to figuration in his earliest drawings and paintings, he offered a sharp critique of consumerist behavior and popular taste, with its desire for both sleek new furnishings and kitsch decorative elements. As the juxtaposition of images and contradictory approaches in his notebooks demonstrate, Polke remained a contrarian throughout his life.

Sigmar Polke, German, 1941–2010 Untitled (Quetta, Pakistan) 1974/1978.  Gelatin silver print with applied color 22 3/8 × 33 13/16″ (56.9 × 85.9 cm) Glenstone Photo: Alex Jamison © 2014 Estate of Sigmar Polke/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Sigmar Polke, German, 1941–2010, Untitled (Quetta, Pakistan) 1974/1978.
Gelatin silver print with applied color, 22 3/8 × 33 13/16″ (56.9 × 85.9 cm) Glenstone
Photo: Alex Jamison
© 2014 Estate of Sigmar Polke/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

The first gallery within MoMA’s Contemporary Galleries begins with Polke’s work in the 1960s, when he examined the desires and drab realities of postwar reconstruction by singling out images of food, housing blocks, and symbols of the often unrequited longing for leisure. His source images were frequently drawn from newspapers and magazines, where the topics of the day occupied the same page as cartoons and advertisements. Polke was particularly interested in the halftone reproductions (images made up of grids of tiny dots that the eye blends to form a picture) that were common in cheaply printed mass media. From 1963 onward, Polke created a series of paintings in which he painstakinglytranscribed—albeit not always faithfully—the dots of his halftone source. He often began by spraying a layer of paint through a perforated metal sheet; to these dots he added others by hand. By creating or amplifying distortions in his source images, he undermined the photographs’ alleged fidelity to reality and collapsed the distinction between figuration and abstraction. Works on view include Chocolate Painting (1964)Girlfriends (1965/66), and Japanese Dancers (1966). Continue reading