THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART ANNOUNCES HENRI MATISSE: THE CUT-OUTS, THE MOST EXTENSIVE EXHIBITION OF THE ARTIST’S LATE WORK EVER MOUNTED

Exhibition to Debut MoMA’s Newly Conserved Monumental Cut-Out The Swimming Pool

The Museum of Modern Art has announced Henri Matisse: The Cut- Outs, the largest and most extensive presentation of Matisse’s cut-outs ever mounted, on view from October 25, 2014, through February 8, 2015. This groundbreaking reassessment of the final chapter of the artist’s career includes approximately 100 cut-outs—drawn from public and private collections around the globe—along with a selection of related drawings, illustrated books, stained glass, and textiles, as well as the post-conservation debut of MoMA’s own The Swimming Pool (1952). Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs is organized by The Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with Tate Modern, London. It is organized at MoMA by Karl Buchberg, Senior Conservator, Department of Conservation, and Jodi Hauptman, Senior Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, with Samantha Friedman, Assistant Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints. Prior to its presentation at MoMA the exhibition is on view at Tate Modern from April 17 through September 7, 2014.

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). The Swimming Pool (La Piscine), late summer 1952. Maquette for ceramic (realized 1999 and 2005). Gouache on paper, cut and pasted, on painted paper. Overall 73 x 647” (185.4 x 1653.3 cm). Installed as nine panels in two parts on burlap-covered walls 136” (345.4 cm) high. Frieze installed at a height of 65” (165 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Mrs Bernard F. Gimbel Fund, 1975 © 2014 Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). The Swimming Pool (La Piscine), late summer 1952. Maquette for ceramic (realized 1999 and 2005). Gouache on paper, cut and pasted, on painted paper. Overall 73 x 647” (185.4 x 1653.3 cm). Installed as nine panels in two parts on burlap-covered walls 136” (345.4 cm) high. Frieze installed at a height of 65” (165 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Mrs Bernard F. Gimbel Fund, 1975 © 2014 Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

In the late 1940s, Henri Matisse (1869–1954) turned increasingly to cut paper as his primary medium and scissors as his chief implement, introducing a radically new kind of work that came to be called a cut-out. Matisse cut painted sheets into forms of varying shapes and sizes— from the vegetal to the abstract—which he then arranged into lively compositions, striking for their play with color and contrast, their exploitation of decorative strategies, and their economy of means. Initially, these compositions were of modest size but, over time, their scale grew along with Matisse’s ambitions for them, expanding into mural- or room-sizeworks. A brilliant final chapter in Matisse’s long career, the cut-outs reflect both a renewed commitment to form and color and an inventiveness freshly directed to the status of the work of art, whether as a unique object, environment, ornament, or a hybrid of all of these.

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). Composition Green Background (Composition fond vert), 1947. Gouache on paper, cut and pasted, and pencil. 41 x 15 7/8” (104.1 x 40.3 cm). The Menil Collection, Houston. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). Composition Green Background (Composition fond vert), 1947. Gouache on paper, cut and pasted, and pencil. 41 x 15 7/8” (104.1 x 40.3 cm). The Menil Collection, Houston. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). Two Masks (The Tomato) (Deux Masques [La Tomate]), 1947. Gouache on paper, cut and pasted. 18¾ x 20 3/8 (47.7 x 51.8 cm). Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Marron, New York. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954). Two Masks (The Tomato) (Deux Masques [La Tomate]), 1947. Gouache on paper, cut and pasted. 18¾ x 20 3/8 (47.7 x 51.8 cm). Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Marron, New York. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The exhibition was sparked by a multiyear initiative to conserve the Museum’s monumental cut-out The Swimming Pool, acquired in 1975. The room-size work has been off view at MoMA for more than 20 years, and will return to view in MoMA’s exhibition following extensive conservation. Matisse’s only cut-out composed for a specific room—the artist’s dining room in his apartment in Nice, France—The Swimming Pool depicts swimmers splashing in water and leaping through air in a reduced palette of blue and white, fulfilling Matisse’s grand ambition to work at the scale of a mural.

Although The Swimming Pool is at the conceptual heart of MoMA’s presentation of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, the exhibition goes well beyond it, encompassing works with a fuller palette, of differing degrees of abstraction and decoration, and in a range of sizes. It is part of the Museum’s long and deep commitment to Matisse’s oeuvre, which comprises an outstanding collection that reflects his activities across mediums, exhibitions that have considered both his entire career and more focused aspects, and new scholarship.

Matisse’s studio, Hôtel Régina, Nice, c. 1953. Photo: Lydia Delectorskaya. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse

Matisse’s studio, Hôtel Régina, Nice, c. 1953. Photo: Lydia Delectorskaya. © 2014 Succession H. Matisse

The result of in-depth research on two fronts—conservation and curatorial—Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs offers a reconsideration of the cut-outs by exploring a host of technical and conceptual issues: the artist’s methods and materials and the role and function of the works in his practice; their environmental aspects; their sculptural and temporal presence as their painted surfaces exhibited texture and materiality, curled off the walls, and shifted in position over time; and their double lives, first as contingent and mutable in the studio and, ultimately, as “permanent,” a transformation accomplished via mounting and framing. The exhibition also mines the tensions that lurk in all the cut-outs, between completion and process, fine art and decoration, drawing and color.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue edited by Karl Buchberg, Nicholas Cullinan, Jodi Hauptman, and Nicholas Serota, with additional contributions by Samantha Friedman, Flavia Frigeri, Markus Gross, and Stephan Lohrengel.

Bank of America is the Global Sponsor of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs. Major support for the MoMA presentation is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. Additional funding is provided by Dian Woodner and by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund. Park Hyatt® is the hotel sponsor of Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs.

Lancôme Announces Lupita Nyong’o as Brand Ambassadress

Maison Lancôme is delighted to announce Academy award winning actress Lupita Nyong’o as its new brand ambassadress.

With her instinctive and sophisticated talent and one of a kind beauty, both delicate and exuding strength, 31-year-old Lupita Nyong’o has taken the world by storm. She received an Academy Award® in the category of “Best Supporting Actress” for her moving portrayal of Patsey in Steve McQueen’s acclaimed film 12 Years a Slave–making her the fourth Academy Award® winning Lancôme ambassadress. Her performance also won her many other prestigious awards worldwide, including the Screen Actors Guild® Award, the Independent Spirit Award, NAACP Award, as well as the 2013 Hollywood Film Awards’ “New Hollywood Award.”

Lupita

Lupita Nyong’o, a recent graduate from the Yale School of Drama, has an eclectic artistic repertoire, having performed on stage as well as having directed the award-winning feature-length documentary, In My Genes, about the reality of living with albinism in Kenya. She was recently seen in the action thriller Non-Stop, opposite Liam Neeson and Julianne Moore. The Mexican-born, Kenyan actress is an outstanding example of a natural beauty. Confident and simply true to herself, she embraces life with freshness, citing happiness as the most attractive form of radiance.

“I am truly honored to join the Maison Lancôme, a brand with such a prestigious history that I have always loved. I am particularly proud to represent its unique vision for  women and the idea that beauty should not be dictated, but should instead be an expression of a woman’s freedom to be herself,” confided Lupita Nyong’o. Joining Julia Roberts, Kate Winslet, Penélope Cruz, and the recently appointed young actress Lily Collins, Lupita Nyong’o will be seen this summer in campaigns shot by star photographers Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott.

Oscar®-nominated actress Lupita Nyong'o arrives for the live ABC Telecast of The 86th Oscars® at the Dolby® Theatre on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, CA.

Oscar®-nominated actress Lupita Nyong’o arrives for the live ABC Telecast of The 86th Oscars® at the Dolby® Theatre on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, CA.

“Both talented and committed, true to her African beauty, and showing a great curiosity and open-mindedness in her career choices, Lupita is by essence the Lancôme woman.” stated Françoise Lehmann, General Manager of Lancôme International. “A strikingly beautiful and intelligent woman, serenely but strongly living her life her own way, Lupita has this special kind of aura both enlightening and deep.”

Xavier Vey, President of Lancôme USA added, “Lupita’s authentic inner and outer beauty, her exquisite grace, and true confidence represent today’s modern woman.  Having Lupita as a Lancôme ambassadress will help support our mission in the U.S. market which is to speak to all women.  Her rising star status is like a blooming rose; she is elegant and has an undeniable brilliance.”