Celebrate Christmas and New Year at Mandarin Oriental, Macau

Mandarin Oriental, Macau

Mandarin Oriental, Macau

To celebrate this festive season in style, Mandarin Oriental, Macau has lined up delightful menus, themed afternoon teas, and gorgeous goodies and hampers, all designed by DOMINIQUE BUGNAND, DIRECTOR OF CULINARY OPERATIONS AND FOOD & BEVERAGE. The award-winning Spa at Mandarin Oriental, Macau has also prepared special hampers featuring the most popular aromatherapy products of all times for guests to further pamper their loved ones. In addition, photo opportunities abound in the hotel, which highlights both a beautifully decorated Christmas tree and a visit from Santa Claus on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Restaurant Vida Rica-01 At the hotel’s signature Vida Rica Restaurant, diners can enjoy a sumptuous six-course Christmas Eve dinner and an exquisite four-course Christmas Day dinner. Menu highlights include duck liver terrine with Gluehwein reduction, blue lobster with caviar, and pan-seared wild sea bass with champagne risotto. The Christmas Eve dinner is priced at MOP1,088 per person, and the Christmas Day dinner set is MOP 788 per person. Champagne and wine pairings are available, and diners who order the set menus will receive a complimentary glass of Gluehwein and specially prepared “goodies pouch” of assorted festive sweets.

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Vida Rida Restaurant Bar

To mark New Year’s Eve, Vida Rica Restaurant is offering an extravagant eight-course spread at MOP1,350 per person which includes a glass of Moët & Chandon Champagne. The delectable dishes on this menu include langoustine consommé with sea urchin and charcoaled abalone, and char-grilled smoked Wagyu beef strip loin with Perigord black truffle. At the chic Vida Rica Bar, which boasts stunning views of Macau Tower and the city’s waterfront, a chocolate and tapas afternoon buffet is available on 24, 25 December 2013 and 1 January 2014. Priced at MOP498 per person, the delicious afternoon buffet with its dazzling array of festive fare is a great choice for celebrations with family and friends. Guests looking for a more luxurious experience should not miss out on the chef’s tapas menu, which features a fine selection of delicacies such as Gillardeau oyster, tuna toro confit with Alba white truffle, Beluga caviar, Wagyu beef tartar and a 30-month Iberico ham. This menu is priced at MOP1,488 for two, from 1 to 30 December 2013, between 6pm and 11pm, and MOP1,588 for two on 31 December 2013, from 6pm to midnight. Both options include a bottle of Moët & Chandon Champagne.

Lobby Lounge

Lobby Lounge

As an ideal spot for relaxed meetings and leisure time, Lobby Lounge is serving a festive afternoon tea set, featuring a myriad of delicate desserts such as candied Christmas fruitcake and gingerbread sable with Valrhona chocolate ganache, coupled with a choice of freshly-brewed coffee, fine tea or hot chocolate. This menu is available from 1 December 2013 to 7 January 2014 between 2pm and 5:30pm, and is valued at MOP388 for two.

Mandarin Oriental Cake Shop

Mandarin Oriental Cake Shop

Mandarin Oriental Cake Shop helps guests send their seasonal greetings to family, friends and business associates by offering the Mandarin Oriental Deluxe Hamper and Mandarin Oriental Supreme Hamper, priced at MOP2,988 and MOP4,088 respectively. These luxurious hampers include treats like Christmas rum and dried fruitcake, homemade stollen, Moët & Chandon Rosé Imperial, and more. Custom-made hampers are also available, as well as Christmas pudding, gingerbread house and Christmas mince pies for those with a craving for festive sweets.

Everyone needs a little pampering, especially during the festive season. The Spa at Mandarin Oriental, Macau’s Radiant Face & Body Spa Hamper and Revitalising Body Spa Hamper, both priced at MOP1,998, are packed with therapeutic delights that will help relax and rejuvenate the body and mind, which are perfect for lovers of beauty and skincare. Prices are subject to 10% service charge, except for gourmet hampers and takeaway items. Prices of the spa hampers are subject to 5% government tourism tax.

For reservations, please call Vida Rica Restaurant at +853 8805 8918, Vida Rica Bar at +853 8805 8928, Lobby Lounge at +853 8805 8938, Mandarin Oriental Cake Shop at +853 8805 8948 and The Spa at Mandarin Oriental, Macau at +853 8805 8588. Mandarin Oriental, Macau is ideally situated in the heart of Macau’s business, entertainment and high-end retail districts, offering easy access to all major tourist sites and transport hubs. Both Macau International Airport and the Macau-China border are only 10 minutes by car, while the Hong Kong-Macau ferry terminal is just a short five-minute drive away. From here, Hong Kong’s airport can be directly accessed by ferry in 45 minutes and Central Hong Kong in just one hour.

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Crystal Cruises has 19 Ways to “Getaway” to Asia in 2014

Guests around the jacuzzi on Crystal Symphony

Guests around the jacuzzi on Crystal Symphony

Crystal Cruises (www.crystalcruiese.com) has created 19 new “Crystal Getaways” in Asia and surrounding region for 2014.  Time-strapped travelers now have almost twice as many options to enjoy an ultra-luxe, all-inclusive, exotic cruise in Japan, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Mauritius, Africa, and Australia next year.  The Crystal Symphony and Crystal Serenity voyages range from five- to ten-days—making them ideal to either enjoy on their own or combine with time ashore.  Carved out from longer sailings, the “Getaways” start as low as $1,520 per person, double occupancy, if booked by January 3’s “Book Now” deadline.

Crystal Symphony Guests in Pool Pods

Crystal Symphony Guests in Pool Pods

Packed with local overnights, the choices include:

5-day: from $1,520

Feb 17: Shanghai (overnight)–Hong Kong (two nights)

Feb 23: Darwin–Komodo I.–Lombok (maiden call)–Bali (two nights)

Mar 5: Bangkok (overnight)–Sihanoukville–Singapore (overnight)

6-day: $2,685

Apr 3: Ho Chi Minh City (overnight)–Chan May–Hong Kong (overnight)

7-day: from $1,585

Feb 10: Tokyo’s port of Yokohama (overnight)–Osaka (overnight)–Nagasaki–Shanghai

Feb 15: Nagasaki–Shanghai (overnight)–Hong Kong (two nights)

Feb 16: Sydney–Cairns (overnight)–cruising the Great Barrier Reef–Darwin

Apr 19: Beijing–Dalian–Shanghai (two nights)–Nagasaki

Dec 7: Bali (overnight)–Semarang–Jakarta–Singapore (overnight)

Dec 14: Singapore–Koh Samui–Sihanoukville–Bangkok (overnight)

 

8-day: from $2,420

Feb 22: Hong Kong (overnight)—Hanoi (overnight)–Chan May–Ho Chi Minh City (overnight)

Feb 28: Bali (overnight)–Surabaya–Semarang–Makassar (maiden call)–Kota Kinabalu

Mar 2: Ho Chi Minh City (overnight)—Bangkok (overnight)—Sihanoukville–Singapore (overnight)

Mar 20: Mauritius—Durban—Port Elizabeth–Cape Town (overnight)

Mar 26: Singapore (overnight)–Bangkok (overnight)–Ho Chi Minh City (overnight)

Apr 19: Beijing–Dalian–Shanghai (two nights)–Nagasaki—Osaka

April 23: Shanghai (overnight)—Nagasaki—Osaka (overnight)—Shimuzu—Tokyo (overnight)

9-day: $4,620

Feb 13: Osaka (overnight)—Nagasaki—Shanghai (overnight)–Hong Kong (two nights)

10-day: $4,180

Mar 10: Singapore (overnight)—Jakarta–Mauritius

Whether craving a warm weather escape in winter, planning a family vacation over school break, or some inspiration and pampering in a region that does both so well, we have a plethora of choices for travelers,” says Crystal President Edie Bornstein.

“Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal” at The Museum of Modern Art

February 01, 2014–June 01, 2014

The Robert Menschel Architecture and Design Gallery, third floor

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers, New York. 1927–31. Aerial perspective. Graphite and colored pencil on tracing paper, 23 3/4 x 15” (60.3 x 38.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Jeffrey P. Klein Purchase Fund, Barbara Pine Purchase Fund, and Frederieke Taylor Purchase Fund

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). St. Mark’s-in-the-Bouwerie Towers, New York. 1927–31. Aerial perspective. Graphite and colored pencil on tracing paper, 23 3/4 x 15” (60.3 x 38.1 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Jeffrey P. Klein Purchase Fund, Barbara Pine Purchase Fund, and Frederieke Taylor Purchase Fund

Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal, organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, examines the tension in Wright’s thinking about the growing American city in the 1920s and 1930s, when he worked simultaneously on radical new forms for the American skyscraper and on a comprehensive vision for the urbanization of the American landscape in what he called “Broadacre City.” The spectacular model of that plan, for a low-density development over a vast territory, is among the most startling and beautiful of the many large-scale models prepared for exhibition by Wright and his associates and students at Taliesin. It toured the country for several years in the 1930s, beginning with a display at Rockefeller Center. Paired with Wright’s projects for skyscrapers—from designs for Manhattan (St. Marks in the Bowery proposal) to an ideal project for a mile-high skyscraper—the work reveals that Wright was as much a theoretician of the horizontal as of the vertical city. In this way his work is not only of historic importance, but of remarkable relevance to current debates on urban concentration. Architecture and Design Collection Exhibitions at MoMA are made possible by Hyundai Card.

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Frank Lloyd Wright and Eugene Masselink at the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect. November 13, 1940–January 5, 1941. The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York. Photo by Soichi Sunami

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Model of Broadacre City. 1934–35. Photograph, 6 5/8 x 4 1/4” (16.8 x 10.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York). Photo by Roy E. Petersen

Model of Broadacre City under construction by Taliesin Fellows. 1934–35. Photograph, 9 9/16 x 7” (24.3 x 17.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Model of Broadacre City under construction by Taliesin Fellows. 1934–35. Photograph, 9 9/16 x 7” (24.3 x 17.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). Broadacre City Project. 1934–35. Model: painted wood, 152 x 152” (386.1 x 386.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). Broadacre City Project. 1934–35. Model: painted wood, 152 x 152” (386.1 x 386.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). Grouped Towers, Chicago. 1930. Perspective. Pencil and ink on paper, 19 x 28 1/4” (48.3 x 71.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). Grouped Towers, Chicago. 1930. Perspective. Pencil and ink on paper, 19 x 28 1/4” (48.3 x 71.8 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). Grouped Towers, Chicago. 1930. Plan of the pedestal. Pencil on tracing paper, 13 3/4 x 35 3/8” (34.9 x 89.9 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959). Grouped Towers, Chicago. 1930. Plan of the pedestal. Pencil on tracing paper, 13 3/4 x 35 3/8” (34.9 x 89.9 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Model of the H.C. Price Company Tower under construction by Taliesin Fellows. n.d. Photograph, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2” (19.7 x 24.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Model of the H.C. Price Company Tower under construction by Taliesin Fellows. n.d. Photograph, 7 3/4 x 9 1/2” (19.7 x 24.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)

Elegance in an Age of Crisis: Fashions of the 1930s at The Museum at FIT

February 7, 2014 – April 19, 2014

The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (MFIT) presents Elegance in an Age of Crisis: Fashions of the 1930s, an exhibition that celebrates the most innovative and beautifully designed clothing made in the 20th century. This is the first exhibition to concurrently examine both men’s and women’s fashion of the 1930s, specifically objects made by the era’s finest dressmakers and men’s clothiers. Haute couture and bespoke tailoring are equally represented by the approximately 80 ensembles and 30 accessories that are arranged thematically in an exhibition environment designed to evoke the restrained style of the era.

Dusty apricot silk chiffon evening dress; front of dress bodice is cowl draped with pleated chiffon used horizontally; pleats are caught at waist seam draping up either side and caught into piped armhole; panel of pleats hang from drape to floor at center front; plain underarm panel of chiffon on either side; pleated panel of chiffon hangs from wide piped neck to back dipping hem; 3/4 inch self sash from front ties around waist to back bow. Dusty apricot silk chiffon bolero entirely pleated; pleats swirl from horizontal in front to vertical at back and are held by rows of stitching; flaring sleeves vertically pleated with five rows of stay stitching from elbow to cuffs; lined in sheer silk. Apricot silk crepe slip with fitted bust yoke edged at top with nude marquisette; narrow marquisette straps; long fitted darts on either side front; elasticized panel across back at waist; slit on either side at hem has scallops which continue around hem; scalloped chiffon addition 2.5 inches wide around crepe hem; zipper closing at left side. HélèneYrande, Negligee ensemble, Coral and peach pleated, Silk chiffon, 1932, France                                                                                                      The Museum at FIT, 75.69.9, Gift of Sophie Gimbel

HélèneYrande, Negligee ensemble, Coral and peach pleated, Silk chiffon, 1932, France The Museum at FIT, 75.69.9, Gift of Sophie Gimbel

The 1930s was a time of grand transformations, when fashion truly began to reflect the streamlined art moderne aesthetic. Garments were softer, minimally ornamented, elegantly proportioned, and markedly different from the preceding periods: the Edwardian era with its stiff, structured clothing, and the shapeless, boxy styles of the 1920s.

Knize, Evening jacket, Blue wool herringbone twill, 1937, Austria, The Museum at FIT, 2000.14.2, Gift of Francis Knize

Knize, Evening jacket, Blue wool herringbone twill, 1937, Austria, The Museum at FIT, 2000.14.2, Gift of Francis Knize

Anderson & Sheppard, Man’s suit, Wool, 1935, London, Collection of Steven Hitchcock

Anderson & Sheppard, Man’s suit, Wool, 1935, London, Collection of Steven Hitchcock

Gardner and Wooley LTD, Smoking jacket, Green velvet, satin  1936, London, Collection of Alan Bennett, Davies and Son

Gardner and Wooley LTD, Smoking jacket, Green velvet, satin
1936, London, Collection of Alan Bennett, Davies and Son

Elegance in an Age of Crisis investigates how clothing creators of the 1930s, despite the crippling financial crisis and dire political environment, spearheaded new stylistic ideas and wed them to emerging technologies. Technical innovations in textile production transformed what was possible for couturiers: looms were wider, dyeing vats were larger, and fibers were more tightly twisted. These expansive and flexible new materials gave dressmakers larger “canvases” upon which to rethink and refine draping techniques, while featherweight textiles lent their garments new suppleness and flexibility. Tailors in both Northern and Southern Europe simultaneously began to deconstruct the jacket and to create a garment that was shapely, yet pliant. Lighter materials, such as linen, were used to make softer jackets.

A synthesis of cutting-edge technology and the finest handcraftsmanship was necessary to forge a truly modern aesthetic in clothing. But these were not the only driving forces of the new look of the 1930s. Artistic influence—mainly the revival and full embrace of classicism across all the plastic arts—spurred a lean, elegantly proportioned aesthetic. It inspired master dressmakers and tailors to experiment with new techniques in order to achieve clothing that enhanced movement and highlighted the “natural,” well-proportioned, and classically idealized body.

The look of the 1930s was an international phenomenon. Menswear tailoring innovations in London and Naples paralleled breakthroughs in haute couture draping in Paris as well as custom design in New York, Havana, and Shanghai. Hollywood, too, played a role in defining and popularizing the glamorous new look. On view in the exhibition is clothing made in these cities for clients from the United States, Latin America, Europe, and Asia.

Although most of the objects in the exhibition come from The Museum at FIT’s permanent collection Elegance in an Age of Crisis has been richly enhanced thanks to the generosity of key lenders. They include rare examples of Neapolitan tailoring from the archives of the Rubinacci Museum; a range of period menswear made in Savile Row and collected by contemporary tailors such as Mr. Alan Bennett of Davies & Sons, and Mr. Steven Hitchcock; and examples of bespoke footwear made by George J. Cleverley, loaned by George Glasgow of G. J. Cleverley. Exquisite haute couture was lent by collector Beverley Birks of New York and fashion editor Hamish Bowles. Patricia Koo Tsien is lending rare qipaos worn by the legendary woman of style Mrs. Wellington Koo. Continue reading

Sundance Institute to Honor Glenn Close at New York Benefit in June 2014

The Sundance Institute announced that it will present actress and arts advocate Glenn Close with its Vanguard Leadership Award in recognition of her distinguished career in entertainment and advocacy of independent film. The award presentation will take place at the fourth annual ‘Celebrate Sundance Institute’ benefit, chaired by Institute Trustees Jeanne Donovan Fisher and Pat Mitchell, on June 4, 2014 in New York City.

I am deeply honored to be receiving the Vanguard Leadership Award from Sundance Institute.,” said Glenn Close. “The Institute is like none other in the world and continues to have a profound impact on all aspects of independent storytelling. Filmmakers who create astounding and original movies against the odds continue to inspire me and give me the courage to believe in what I think is worth the fight.”

Emmy, Golden Globe and Tony Award winner and six-time Academy Award acting nominee Glenn Close has had a distinguished career in film, with prominent roles in The Big Chill, The Natural, Fatal Attraction and Dangerous Liaisons. Close produced and co-wrote the screenplay for last year’s feature film Albert Nobbs, in which she also held the lead role. Also in 2012, Close headlined the fifth and final season of the critically acclaimed original legal thriller, Damages. She is an Emeritus Trustee of the Institute and has served as a Creative Advisor at its Labs for emerging independent filmmakers. She has appeared in several films at the Sundance Film Festival, including Cookie’s Fortune, Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her, Heights, The Chumscrubber and Nine Lives.

Founded by Robert Redford in 1981, Sundance Institute is a global, nonprofit cultural organization dedicated to nurturing artistic expression in film and theater, and to supporting intercultural dialogue between artists and audiences. The Institute promotes independent storytelling to unite, inform and inspire, regardless of geo-political, social, religious or cultural differences. Internationally recognized for its annual Sundance Film Festival and its artistic development programs for directors, screenwriters, producers, film composers, playwrights and theatre artists, Sundance Institute has nurtured such projects as Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, Sin Nombre, An Inconvenient Truth, Spring Awakening, Born into Brothels, Trouble the Water, Light in the Piazza and Angels in America.

Robert Redford, President & Founder of Sundance Institute, said, “Glenn recognized early the need to support independent artists, and she brought to our Board her vision and dedication for doing so. Her contributions to independent film are remarkable and varied, and she continues to build a body of work that inspires other artists.”

Keri Putnam, Executive Director of Sundance Institute, added, “Glenn is among the great champions of independent film, making her a fitting recipient of our Vanguard Leadership Award. We look forward to bringing our creative community together with our friends and supporters in New York to celebrate her many achievements and contributions.”

Close will be the third recipient of the Vanguard Leadership Award, joining philanthropist and former Institute Trustee George Gund and the late journalist and film critic Roger Ebert. In addition to the Vanguard Leadership Award, the Institute presents the Vanguard Award, including a cash grant and mentorship from industry professionals and Institute staff, to an emerging artist with creative independence. Benh Zeitlin (Beasts of the Southern Wild) and Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station) are past recipients, and the 2014 recipient will be announced in the spring. The Vanguard Awards were founded in 2011 to mark the 30th anniversary of the Sundance Institute Feature Film Program and its founding director, Michelle Satter.

The Sundance Institute relies on the generosity of supporters who share a commitment to nurturing new artists, supporting unique and diverse creative voices, and furthering the reach of independent feature and documentary films around the world. The benefit will raise crucial funds to offset the non-profit Institute’s year-round programs for artists, including Labs, grants and the Sundance Film Festival.