Netflix Will Premiere ‘This is Not a Ball’, A Film That Explores The Global Passion For Soccer, On June 13

Netflix will launch the film, ‘This is Not a Ball,’ on June 13th in the US. Produced by Videocine, an affiliate of Grupo Televisa and directed by Academy nominee Vik Muniz and Juan Rendon, ‘This is Not a Ball‘ follows Brazilian artist and photographer Muniz as he explores the world’s passion for soccer and creates a major work of art made of 20,000 soccer balls. ‘This is Not a Ball’, is a 90-minute documentary, produced by Videocine in association with The Mates Contents (El Mall). In the production, Vik Muniz makes the viewers think about relevant questions about the ball and soccer, like “why do we play?”, “why are we so attracted to the ball?”, “why do we kick and chase it?”, “how has it become an instrument that generates empathy among people?”

The production traveled through nine months and nine countries around the world, visiting cities such as Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, New York, Boston, Paris, Kyoto, Burma, Nuremberg in Germany, Sialkot in Pakistan, among others.

‘This is Not a Ball’ is a groundbreaking story about the universal value of soccer and the true meaning of ‘the ball’ through the lens of a very talented production team and amazing partners such as Televisa,” said Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos. “As we continue to deliver a wide range of content on Netflix for everyone in the household, we believe that this documentary will be highly viewed and valued by our members.”

During his travel, Muniz met with a diverse group of people to discuss their love for ‘the ball.’ Interviews included ordinary people, children from the slums of Rio, one of the great minds of science, astrophysicist Neil De Grasse Tyson, social activists who use soccer to promote social change, and outstanding soccer clubs from around the world like Football League of Amputees in Sierra Leone. Each of these narratives inspired contributions to his work of art.

“My work is already on exhibit in Vidigal in Rio de Janeiro and at the Azteca Stadium in Mexico. The photographs will be auctioned to benefit social causes during the World Cup in Brazil, and the amount collected will be donated to foundations in different cities,” said Vik Muniz. “On behalf of the production team, we are very honored that our work will be available to millions of people around the world through Netflix and other networks.”

Other soccer related titles available on Netflix include: The Beautiful Game, The Big Green, A Barefoot Dream, The Great Match, 30 for 30: Soccer Stories and 1:1 Thierry Henry.

Target and Joseph Altuzarra Announce Fall 2014 Collaboration

Limited-edition collection to include apparel, accessories and shoes for the modern, sophisticated woman

Target Corporation announced it is partnering with Joseph Altuzarra – a luxury fashion brand known for merging femininity, sophistication and practicality – on a limited-edition collection of women’s ready-to-wear, accessories and shoes. The collection will be available Sept. 14 at most Target stores in the United States and Canada, as well as http://www.Target.com. Additionally, an edited assortment of the Target collection will be available globally at NET-A-PORTER.COM.

Joseph Altuzarra by Simon Cave

Joseph Altuzarra by Simon Cave

The Altuzarra brand is celebrated for embodying a combination of French sophistication and American ease, appealing to refined, independent women. Season after season, the Altuzarra brand continues to grow in popularity, with a strong celebrity following including Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Bosworth, Cameron Diaz, Michelle Dockery and Cate Blanchett, among others. Born in Paris and raised by a Chinese-American mother and French father, Joseph attended Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania and remained in the United States to begin his design career in New York City. His multicultural influences and early work with prominent designers led him to establish his namesake line in 2008. From there, Joseph quickly became a fashion force, receiving numerous prestigious awards and nominations.

In January 2010, he was the recipient of the Ecco Domani Fashion Fund Award and Fashion Group International’s Rising Star of the Year Award. He also received the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA)/Vogue Fashion Fund Award in 2011 and the CFDA Swarovski Award for Womenswear Design in 2012. Last night at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, he was announced as the winner of the 2014 CFDA Womenswear Designer of the Year award, as voted upon by members of the CFDA and other eligible voters.

Lupita Nyongo, Joseph Altuzarra

Lupita Nyongo, Joseph Altuzarra

This fall, Altuzarra’s aesthetic arrives at Target, empowering women to discover the transformative power of fashion at affordable prices. The collection features a mix of iconic Altuzarra silhouettes with designs created specifically for Target. It includes nearly 50 items, ranging in price from $17.99 to $89.99 for apparel and lingerie, and $29.99 to $79.99 for shoes and accessories.

As a designer, I believe firmly in the transformative power of fashion. It has the ability to not only change how you look, but also how you feel,” said Joseph Altuzarra, the brand’s designer and creative director. “I’ve admired the elegance that Target brings to fast fashion. By working together on this capsule collection, we hope to instill a sense of power, confidence and beauty in women everywhere.”

Altuzarra for Target Maxi Swiss Dot Sketch

Altuzarra for Target Maxi Swiss Dot Sketch

We’re always on the hunt for designers who we believe will inspire our guests,” said Trish Adams, executive vice president of apparel and home, Target. “Joseph’s passion for making women feel confident in their fashion choices is unrivaled, and this fall, Target’s guests can experience his signature style at prices that are almost too good to be true.”

We are thrilled to be a part of this collaboration with Target and Altuzarra,” states Alison Loehnis, president, NET-A-PORTER.COM. “The collection is everything we have come to expect from Joseph’s aesthetic – chic, sophisticated and modern. We are so excited to offer NET-A-PORTER customers an opportunity to own these fabulous pieces.

More information about Altuzarra for Target is available on ABullseyeView.com. Guests can join in on the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using #AltuzarraforTarget.

July is National Ice Cream Month

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Sunday of the month as National Ice Cream Day. He recognized ice cream as a fun and nutritious food that is enjoyed by a full 90 percent of the nation’s population. In the proclamation, President Reagan called for all people of the United States to observe these events with “appropriate ceremonies and activities.”

The International Ice Cream Association (IICA) encourages retailers and consumers to celebrate July as National Ice Cream Month. In 2014, National Ice Cream Day will be Sunday, July 20.

The U.S. ice cream industry generated total revenues of $10 billion in 2010, with take-home ice cream sales representing the largest section of the market, generating revenues of $6.8 billion or 67.7 percent of the market’s overall value. (Source: MarketLine, an Informa business)

About 9 percent of all the milk produced by U.S. dairy farmers is used to produce ice cream, contributing significantly to the economic well-being of the nation’s dairy industry.

Founded in 1900, IICA is the trade association for manufacturers and distributors of ice cream and other frozen dessert products. The association’s activities range from legislative and regulatory advocacy to market research, education and training. Its 80 member companies manufacture and distribute an estimated 85% of the ice cream and frozen dessert products consumed in the United States. IICA is a constituent organization of IDFA.

The Evolution of Ice Cream

Ice cream’s origins are known to reach back as far as the second century B.C., although no specific date of origin nor inventor has been undisputably credited with its discovery. We know that Alexander the Great enjoyed snow and ice flavored with honey and nectar. Biblical references also show that King Solomon was fond of iced drinks during harvesting. During the Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Caesar (A.D. 54-86) frequently sent runners into the mountains for snow, which was then flavored with fruits and juices.

Over a thousand years later, Marco Polo returned to Italy from the Far East with a recipe that closely resembled what is now called sherbet. Historians estimate that this recipe evolved into ice cream sometime in the 16th century. England seems to have discovered ice cream at the same time, or perhaps even earlier than the Italians. “Cream Ice,” as it was called, appeared regularly at the table of Charles I during the 17th century. France was introduced to similar frozen desserts in 1553 by the Italian Catherine de Medici when she became the wife of Henry II of France. It wasn’t until 1660 that ice cream was made available to the general public. The Sicilian Procopio introduced a recipe blending milk, cream, butter and eggs at Café Procope, the first café in Paris.

Ice Cream for America

The first official account of ice cream in the New World comes from a letter written in 1744 by a guest of Maryland Governor William Bladen. The first advertisement for ice cream in this country appeared in the New York Gazette on May 12, 1777, when confectioner Philip Lenzi announced that ice cream was available “almost every day.” Records kept by a Chatham Street, New York, merchant show that President George Washington spent approximately $200 for ice cream during the summer of 1790. Inventory records of Mount Vernon taken after Washington’s death revealed “two pewter ice cream pots.” President Thomas Jefferson was said to have a favorite 18-step recipe for an ice cream delicacy that resembled a modern-day Baked Alaska. Check out President Jefferson’s vanilla ice cream recipe here. In 1813, Dolley Madison served a magnificent strawberry ice cream creation at President Madison’s second inaugural banquet at the White House.

Until 1800, ice cream remained a rare and exotic dessert enjoyed mostly by the elite. Around 1800, insulated ice houses were invented. Manufacturing ice cream soon became an industry in America, pioneered in 1851 by a Baltimore milk dealer named Jacob Fussell. Like other American industries, ice cream production increased because of technological innovations, including steam power, mechanical refrigeration, the homogenizer, electric power and motors, packing machines, and new freezing processes and equipment. In addition, motorized delivery vehicles dramatically changed the industry. Due to ongoing technological advances, today’s total frozen dairy annual production in the United States is more than 1.6 billion gallons.

Wide availability of ice cream in the late 19th century led to new creations. In 1874, the American soda fountain shop and the profession of the “soda jerk” emerged with the invention of the ice cream soda. In response to religious criticism for eating “sinfully” rich ice cream sodas on Sundays, ice cream merchants left out the carbonated water and invented the ice cream “Sunday” in the late 1890’s. The name was eventually changed to “sundae” to remove any connection with the Sabbath.

Ice cream became an edible morale symbol during World War II. Each branch of the military tried to outdo the others in serving ice cream to its troops. In 1945, the first “floating ice cream parlor” was built for sailors in the western Pacific. When the war ended, and dairy product rationing was lifted, America celebrated its victory with ice cream. Americans consumed over 20 quarts of ice cream per person in 1946.

In the 1940s through the ‘70s, ice cream production was relatively constant in the United States. As more prepackaged ice cream was sold through supermarkets, traditional ice cream parlors and soda fountains started to disappear. Now, specialty ice cream stores and unique restaurants that feature ice cream dishes have surged in popularity. These stores and restaurants are popular with those who remember the ice cream shops and soda fountains of days past, as well as with new generations of ice cream fans.

The History of the Ice Cream Cone

For over a century, Americans have been enjoying ice cream on a cone. Whether it’s a waffle cone, a sugar cone or a wafer cone, what better way to enjoy a double scoop of your favorite flavor?

Making Its Appearance

The first ice cream cone was produced in 1896 by Italo Marchiony. Marchiony, who emigrated from Italy in the late 1800s, invented his ice cream cone in New York City. He was granted a patent in December 1903.

Although Marchiony is credited with the invention of the cone, a similar creation was independently introduced at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair by Ernest A. Hamwi, a Syrian concessionaire. Hamwi was selling a crisp, waffle-like pastry — zalabis — in a booth right next to an ice cream vendor. Because of ice cream’s popularity, the vendor ran out of dishes. Hamwi saw an easy solution to the ice cream vendor’s problem: he quickly rolled one of his wafer-like waffles in the shape of a cone, or cornucopia, and gave it to the ice cream vendor. The cone cooled in a few seconds, the vendor put some ice cream in it, the customers were happy and the cone was on its way to becoming the great American institution that it is today.

A Business is Born

St. Louis, a foundry town, quickly capitalized on the cone’s success. Enterprising people invented special baking equipment for making the World’s Fair cornucopia cones.

Stephen Sullivan of Sullivan, Missouri, was one of the first known independent operators in the ice cream cone business. In 1906, Sullivan served ice cream cones (or cornucopias, as they were still called) at the Modern Woodmen of America Frisco Log Rolling in Sullivan, Missouri.

At the same time, Hamwi was busy with the Cornucopia Waffle Company. In 1910, he founded the Missouri Cone Company, later known as the Western Cone Company.

As the modern ice cream cone developed, two distinct types of cones emerged. The rolled cone was a waffle, baked in a round shape and rolled (first by hand, later mechanically) as soon as it came off the griddle. In a few seconds, it hardened in the form of a crisp cone. The second type of cone was molded either by pouring batter into a shell, inserting a core on which the cone was baked, and then removing the core; or pouring the batter into a mold, baking it and then splitting the mold so the cone could be removed with little difficulty.

In the 1920s, the cone business expanded. Cone production in 1924 reached a record 245 million. Slight changes in automatic machinery have led to the ice cream cone we know today. Now, millions of rolled cones are turned out on machines that are capable of producing about 150,000 cones every 24 hours.

From the Cow to the Cone

How Ice Cream is Made

Everybody has a favorite flavor or brand of ice cream, and the debate over whose ice cream is the best rages on each year. While each manufacturer develops its own special recipes, ice cream production basics are basically the same everywhere.

The most important ice cream ingredients come from milk. The dairy ingredients are crucial in determining the characteristics of the final frozen product. Federal regulations state that ice cream must have at least 10% milkfat, the single most critical ingredient. The use of varying percentages of milkfat affects the palatability, smoothness, color, texture and food value of the finished product. Gourmet or superpremium ice creams contain at least 12% milkfat, usually more.

Ice cream contains nonfat solids (the non-fat, protein part of the milk), which contribute nutritional value (protein, calcium, minerals and vitamins). Nonfat dry milk, skim milk and whole milk are the usual sources of nonfat solids.

The sweeteners used in ice cream vary from cane or beet sugar to corn sweeteners or honey. Stabilizers, such as plant derivatives, are commonly used in small amounts to prevent the formation of large ice crystals and to make a smoother ice cream. Emulsifiers, such as lecithin and mono- and diglycerides, are also used in small amounts. They provide uniform whipping qualities to the ice cream during freezing, as well as a smoother and drier body and texture in the frozen form.

These basic ingredients are agitated and blended in a mixing tank. The mixture is then pumped into a pasteurizer, where it is heated and held at a predetermined temperature. The hot mixture is then “shot” through a homogenizer, where pressure of 2,000 to 2,500 pounds per square inch breaks the milkfat down into smaller particles, allowing the mixture to stay smooth and creamy. The mix is then quick-cooled to about 40°F and frozen via the “continuous freezer” method (the “batch freezer” method) that uses a steady flow of mix that freezes a set quantity of ice cream one batch at a time.

During freezing, the mix is aerated by “dashers,” revolving blades in the freezer. The small air cells that are incorporated by this whipping action prevent ice cream from becoming a solid mass of frozen ingredients. The amount of aeration is called “overrun,” and is limited by the federal standard that requires the finished product must not weigh less than 4.5 pounds per gallon.

The next step is the addition of bulky flavorings, such as fruits, nuts and chocolate chips. The ingredients are either “dropped” or “shot” into the semi-solid ice cream after it leaves the freezer.

After the flavoring additions are completed, the ice cream can be packaged in a variety of containers, cups or molds. It is moved quickly to a “hardening room,” where sub-zero temperatures freeze the product to its final state for storage and distribution.

Ice Cream Sales & Trends

Just the Facts

Overview

  • About 1.53 billion gallons of ice cream and related frozen desserts were produced in the U.S. in 2011. Source: USDA, National Agriculture Statistics Service
  • The U.S. ice cream industry generated total revenues of $10 billion in 2010, with take-home ice cream sales representing the largest section of the market, generating revenues of $6.8 billion or 67.7 percent of the market’s overall value. Source: MarketLine, an Informa business.
  • The majority of U.S. ice cream and frozen dessert manufacturers have been in business for more than 50 years and many are still family-owned businesses. Source: IDFA ice cream company survey, 2012

Production

  • The central region of the U.S. led production of ice cream and related frozen products, producing 726 million gallons in 2011. Source:  USDA, National Agriculture Statistics Service
  • The U.S. dairy industry produced approximately 20 quarts per capita in 2010, the most recent data available.
  • Frozen dairy production follows a clear seasonal pattern. Summer is the unchallenged season for eating ice cream and other related products. Production kicks up in March and April to fi ll retail and foodservice pipelines in the late spring and early summer. June is the highest production month of the year, but production remains strong through August to satisfy summer demand. Production declines through the end of the year.

 Sales

  • According to a recent survey of International Ice Cream Association member companies, vanilla remains the most popular flavor among their consumers.  Companies said that Chocolate Chip Mint and Cookies and Cream were the next most popular flavors. Source: IDFA ice cream company survey, 2012
  • The majority of ice cream and frozen desserts are marketed regionally. More than 66.7 percent of U.S. ice cream and frozen dessert manufacturers say they market their products regionally, with 16 percent marketing nationally.  The international market accounts for 10 percent and 6.7 percent market locally only. Source: IDFA ice cream company survey, 2012
  • The ice cream companies that market products around the world identify Asia, the Caribbean, Mexico and Latin America as importers. Source: IDFA ice cream company survey, 2012
  • Premium ice cream, which tends to have lower amount of aeration and higher fat content than regular ice cream, is the most popular product with consumers according to a recent survey of U.S. ice cream manufacturers.  In the survey, 79.3 percent cited premium ice cream as the most popular product made while 10 percent said that novelties are most popular.  Novelties are defined as separately packaged single servings of a frozen dessert — such as ice cream sandwiches and fudge sticks. Source: IDFA ice cream company survey, 2012.

What’s Hot in Ice Cream

Flavors

Vanilla continues to be America’s flavor of choice in ice cream and novelties, in both supermarket and foodservice sales. This flavor is the most versatile, mixing well with toppings, drinks and bakery desserts. America’s top five favorite individual flavors are vanilla, chocolate, cookie ‘n cream, strawberry and chocolate chip mint.

However, ice cream flavors are only limited by the imagination. Manufacturers, scoop shops and chefs constantly come up with new and exciting flavors for their customers. To keep consumers looking to see what’s next in the freezer case, individual processors often release limited time “seasonal” flavors, such as gingerbread, peppermint or caramel ice cream for the November/December holidays.

Quality Segments

While the majority of ice cream sales have long been regular-fat products, ice cream manufacturers continue to diversify their lines of frozen desserts in order to fit into various lifestyles – often called “better for you” products. Consumers can find an array of frozen desserts to fit specific dietary needs or wants, such as reduced-fat, fat-free, low-carb, “no sugar added”, added calcium or other nutrients, or lactose-free ice cream. Novelty/single-serving products are also an important part of this trend, as some consumers prefer the pre-packaged portion when counting calories, carbs or fat grams.

However, most consumers are looking for an indulgence when eating ice cream. Therefore, ice cream manufacturers make sure to offer a full selection of premium and superpremium products in innovative flavors and with such mix-ins as cookies, brownies, candies and cake.

Co-branding

Another important trend for ice cream is the continuing popularity of co-branding. Co-branding involves partnering with successful branded companion products for increased product awareness. There has been an increase in the number of new ice cream products that use ingredients from well-known candy, cookie, fruit and flavoring manufacturers. In particular, novelty manufacturers have placed a strong emphasis on co-branding with popular candy flavors. And, some ice cream manufacturers have teamed up in recent years with popular coffee and chocolate brands to create “ultrapremium” products. Market signs indicate that this trend will continue to be important in the future.

What’s in the Ice Cream Aisle?

Definitions of Frozen Dessert Products

Ice cream and frozen desserts come in many flavors and types that allow the consumer to choose from a host of delicious choices. Whether the flavor is vanilla, chocolate, pumpkin pie or cookie dough, ice cream and its related products share certain basic characteristics that are often unknown to — or misunderstood by — many consumers.

Frozen desserts come in many forms.  Each of the following foods has its own definition, and many are standardized by federal regulations:

  • Ice Cream consists of a mixture of dairy ingredients such as milk and nonfat milk, and ingredients for sweetening and flavoring, such as fruits, nuts and chocolate chips. Functional ingredients, such as stabilizers and emulsifiers, are often included in the product to promote proper texture and enhance the eating experience. By federal law, ice cream must contain at least 10% milkfat, before the addition of bulky ingredients, and must weigh a minimum of 4.5 pounds to the gallon.
  • Frozen Custard or French Ice Cream must also contain a minimum of 10% milkfat, as well as at least 1.4 % egg yolk solids.
  • Sherbets have a milkfat content of between 1% and 2%, and a slightly higher sweetener content than ice cream. Sherbet weighs a minimum of 6 pounds to the gallon and is flavored either with fruit or other characterizing ingredients.
  • Gelato is characterized by an intense flavor and is served in a semi-frozen state that is similar to “soft serve” ice cream. Italian-style gelato is more dense than ice cream, since it has less air in the product. Typically, gelato has more milk than cream and also contains sweeteners, egg yolks and flavoring.
  • Sorbet and Water Ices are similar to sherbets, but contain no dairy ingredients.
  • Quiescently Frozen Confection is a frozen novelty such as a water ice novelty on a stick.
  • Frozen Yogurt consists of a mixture of dairy ingredients such as milk and nonfat milk which have been cultured, as well as ingredients for sweetening and flavoring.
  • Novelties are separately packaged single servings of a frozen dessert — such as ice cream sandwiches, fudge sticks and juice bars — that may or may not contain dairy ingredients.

Entertaining Tips with America’s Favorite Treat

No matter what the occasion—a child’s birthday party, an elegant dinner or a casual family get-together —ice cream is a wonderful treat that adds to the celebration. It can be served at the end to the meal, as a snack or even as the main attraction at parties. For your next occasion, get creative with ice cream—you can use one of the attached recipes or put together some cool combinations of your own!

Today’s on-the-go families are opting for simple, elegant entertaining. The less time spent in the kitchen, the better. Ice cream is an easy, delicious and, if desired, fancy solution. Old favorites – sundaes, root beer floats, banana splits, milkshakes, pie a-la-mode, and ice cream cones – are among the most popular and simplest choices. However, serving ideas for ice cream are only as limited as your imagination!

Holidays are perfect for ice cream: Strawberry, vanilla and blueberry scoops create a patriotic treat on the 4th of July. No one would say “bah humbug” to a Santa Claus ice cream cake on Christmas, and a jack-o-lantern ice cream cake would scare up smiles on Halloween. Thanksgiving wouldn’t be the same without apple pie a la mode. Cherry vanilla ice cream molded into a heart shape is perfect for your Valentine. St. Patrick’s Day begs for mint chocolate chip floats, and Easter calls for molded ice cream eggs. In addition, watch your supermarket’s freezer case for special seasonal flavors!

Ice cream is even more delicious when topped off; try hot fudge, chocolate, caramel or even a special liqueur. Add some whipped cream, nuts, fresh summer fruit, sprinkles or cookies for a real treat. A “build-your-own sundae” party is a great way to get everybody in on the fun any day of the week. And don’t forget the cherry!

If there is no occasion coming up, invent one! Don’t forget that July is National Ice Cream Month and Sunday, July 20, 2014, is National Ice Cream Day. To celebrate, try some of the fun ice cream recipes featured in this packet.

Tips on Storing & Handling Ice Cream

Keep It Cool!

The International Ice Cream Association offers these suggestions on the proper handling and storage of ice cream and frozen desserts to help consumers enjoy America’s favorite treat to the fullest.

Ice cream is a perishable product and should be treated carefully. When frozen desserts are exposed to temperatures above 10°F, they become subject to adverse changes in body, texture and flavor characteristics. Although individual manufacturers’ recipes yield ice cream of varying consistency and flavor, all ice cream will be negatively affected if improperly handled or stored. Because of the fluctuating temperatures in most home freezers, IICA recommends that people follow these tips, and enjoy ice cream within a month of purchase.

Here are some tips on how to keep ice cream in its most delectable form:

In the Store:

  • Make the ice cream aisle your last stop during your trip to the supermarket.
  • Check the temperature of your grocer’s freezer case. The temperature in the supermarket’s freezer case should not be above -20°F. If kept at a proper temperature, ice cream will be thoroughly frozen and will feel hard to the touch. If the product is soft, you may wish to bring it to the attention of the store manager.
  • In an open top freezer case, always select ice cream and frozen treats stored below the freezer line.
  • Put ice cream products in the separate section of your grocery cart, or place on top of other groceries.
  • Insulate ice cream products for the ride home. When your groceries are packed, request a freezer bag or additional brown paper bag to insulate your ice cream.
  • Make the grocery store or ice cream parlor your last errand before going home. This will insure that your ice cream does not sit in a warm car while you are making other stops.

At Home:

  • Do not allow ice cream to repeatedly soften and re-freeze. When ice cream’s small ice crystals melt and re-freeze, they can eventually turn into large, unpalatable lumps.
  • Your freezer should be set at between -5°F and 0°F. Ice cream is easy to dip between 6°F and 10°F, the ideal serving temperature range.
  • Store ice cream in the main part of the freezer. Do not store ice cream in the freezer door, where ice cream can be subject to more fluctuating temperatures since the door is repeatedly open and shut.
  • Keep the ice cream container lid tightly closed when storing in the freezer.
  • Don’t store ice cream alongside uncovered foods; odors may penetrate ice cream and affect its flavor.

By following these simple suggestions, you can help ensure that your ice cream and other frozen dessert treats will stay the way they left the manufacturer — attractive and delicious!

For Your Information: The History of Cheese

June is National Dairy Month

National Dairy Month started out as National Milk Month in 1937 as a way to promote drinking milk. It was initially created to stabilize the dairy demand when production was at a surplus, but has now developed into an annual tradition that celebrates the contributions the dairy industry has made to the world After the National Dairy Council stepped in to promote the cause, the name soon changed to “Dairy Month.”

National Dairy Month is a great way to start the summer with nutrient-rich dairy foods. From calcium to potassium, dairy products like milk contain nine essential nutrients which may help to better manage your weight, reduce your risk for high blood pressure, osteoporosis and certain cancers. Whether it’s protein to help build and repair the muscle tissue of active bodies or vitamin A to help maintain healthy skin, dairy products are a natural nutrient powerhouse. Those are just a few of the reasons that you should celebrate dairy not just in June, but all year long.

According to ancient records passed down through the centuries, the making of cheese dates back more than 4,000 years.

No one really knows who made the first cheese. According to an ancient legend, it was made accidentally by an Arabian merchant who put his supply of milk into a pouch made from a sheep’s stomach, as he set out on a day’s journey across the desert. The rennet in the lining of the pouch, combined with the heat of the sun, caused the milk to separate into curd and whey. That night he found that the whey satisfied his thirst, and the cheese (curd) had a delightful flavor which satisfied his hunger.

Travelers from Asia are believed to have brought the art of cheesemaking to Europe. In fact, cheese was made in many parts of the Roman Empire when it was at its height. The Romans, in turn, introduced cheesemaking to England. During the Middle Ages-from the decline of the Roman Empire until the discovery of America-cheese was made and improved by the monks in the monasteries of Europe. For example, Gorgonzola was made in the Po Valley in Italy in 879 A.D., and Italy became the cheesemaking center of Europe during the 10th Century. Roquefort was also mentioned in the ancient records of the monastery at Conques, France as early as 1070.

Cheesemaking continued to flourish in Europe and became an established food. In fact, the Pilgrims included cheese in the Mayflower’s supplies when they made their voyage to America in 1620. The making of cheese quickly spread in the New World, but until the 19th century it remained a local farm industry. It wasn’t until 1851 that the first cheese factory in the United States was built by Jesse Williams in Oneida County, New York.

As population across the United States continued to grow dramatically, the demand for cheese increased and the industry gradually moved westward, centering on the rich farm lands of Wisconsin. In 1845, a band of Swiss immigrants settled in Green County, Wisconsin and started the manufacturing of foreign cheese in America. Most Wisconsin farmers began to believe that their future survival was tied to cheese and their first factory was a Limburger plant which opened in 1868.

The wholesale cheese industry was thus born and showed phenomenal growth during the latter half of the 1800s. By 1880 there were 3,923 dairy factories nationwide which were reported to have made 216 million pounds of cheese that year valued at $17 million. This represented almost 90 percent of total cheese production that year. By the turn of the century, farm production of cheese had become insignificant. The 1904 census reported only factory output, which totaled over 317 million pounds. As cheese demand continued to grow and spread rapidly, manufactured and processed cheese production increased dramatically. Total natural cheese production grew from 418 million pounds in 1920 to 2.2 billion pounds by 1970. Rising demand for cheese throughout the 1970s and 1980s brought total natural cheese production to more than 6 billion pounds by the beginning of the 1990s. Processed cheese also experienced a surge in consumer demand with annual production exceeding 2 billion pounds a year by the beginning of the 1990s.

Currently, more than one-third of all milk produced each year in the U.S. is used to manufacture cheese. Recent increases in the overall demand for farm milk have in large part been due to the continued growth of the cheese industry. As consumer appetites for all types of cheese continue to expand, so will the industry.

Types of Cheeses

Asiago cheese is a nutty flavored cheese that hails from Europe. It is named for a region in Italy where it was first produced. This region is known as the Asiago High Plateau, which lies within the Italian Alps.

Asiago cheese is produced in two forms as follows: fresh Asiago, also known as Pressato, and mature Asiago, which is called Asiago d´Allevo. Fresh Asiago has an off-white color and is milder in flavor than mature asiago. Mature asiago also has a more yellowish color and is somewhat grainy in texture.

Blue cheese is a general classification of cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, or goat’s milk cheeses that have had Penicillium cultures added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue, blue-gray or blue-green mold, and carries a distinct smell. Some blue cheeses are injected with spores before the curds form and others have spores mixed in with the curds after they form. Blue cheese was initially produced in caves Blue cheeses are typically aged in a temperature-controlled environment such as a cave.

The characteristic flavor of blue cheeses tends to be sharp and a bit salty. Due to this strong flavor and smell, blue cheeses are often considered an acquired taste. They can be eaten by themselves or can be crumbled or melted over foods.

Cheddar cheese originated in the village of Cheddar, England. A firm, cow’s milk cheese that ranges in flavor from mild to sharp and in color from a natural white to pumpkin orange. Orange cheddars are colored with annatto, a natural dye. Canadian cheddars are smoother, creamier, and are known for their balance of flavor and sharpness. Cheddars vary in flavor depending on the length of aging and their origin. As cheddar slowly ages, it loses moisture and its texture becomes drier and more crumbly. Sharpness becomes noticeable at 12 months (old cheddar) and 18 months (extra old cheddar). The optimal aging period is 5-6 years; however, for most uses three-year-old cheese is fine and five-year-old cheddar can be saved for special occasions.

Cream cheese is considered to be a fresh type of cheese due to the fact that it is not aged. The flavor is subtle, fresh and sweet, but has a light tangy taste. At room temperature cream cheese spreads easily and has a smooth and creamy texture which makes it rich. It is made by adding cream to cow’s milk which gives it richness but is not ripened, limiting its shelf life. Cream cheese is usually white in color and is available in low fat or non fat varieties.

Feta cheese is one of the oldest cheeses in the world and is said to be a product from Greece. Since October 2002 feta cheese has been formally accepted as a Greek only cheese Feta is soft cheese, and is made from sheep milk if a mixture of sheep and goat milk. More recently cow’s milk has been used. Feta is white in color, is a bit sour to the taste and rich in aroma. Even though it is a soft cheese, it is also manufactured with a partially hard texture.

Goat cheese comes in a variety of forms, although the most common is a soft, easily spread cheese. Goat cheese can also be made in hard aged varieties as well as semi firm cheeses like feta. Goat cheese is especially common in the Middle East, Africa, and some Mediterranean countries, where the hardy goat survives in areas where cows cannot.

Goat cheese is distinctive due to the tangy flavor of goat milk. Sometimes this flavor is very strong and some consumers find it disagreeable. In some cases, the flavor is sought after, and some dairies are well known for producing particularly goaty cheese. The strong flavor is caused by hormones, which will be reduced if milk producing nanny goats are kept away from male billies. In addition, like all animal products, goat milk is heavily influenced by what the goats are eating. Because goats have hardy digestive systems, they tend to eat many bitter plants that more delicate animals such as cows and horses will not.

Swiss cheese is the general name for numerous types of cheese that were initially prepared in Switzerland. Swiss cheese is made from cow’s milk, is lightly flavored, sweet and nutty. Swiss cheese is known for being glossy, light or pale yellow and having large holes in it which is a result of carbon dioxide releases during the process of maturation.

Vegetarian cheese is cheese that is not curdled with rennet, which is an enzyme that exists naturally in animal stomachs. Rennet is the popular name used by cheese makers to coagulate milk, forming curds. Most vegetarian cheeses are coagulated with plants, fungi or bacteria. There are two types of rennet in use by cheese producers: microbial and vegetarian. Microbial rennet consists of enzymes that come from either bacterial or fungal origin. Many strict vegetarians prefer to avoid cheese with this kind of rennet altogether, even though animals are not involved in any way.

There are specific plants that also have the enzymes essential to coagulate milk. Plants that have found more common use as coagulants are fig tree bark, thistle and mallow.

U.S. per capita consumption of natural cheese increased by 0.24 pounds over the 2011 amount, reaching a level of 33.51 pounds, the highest amount on record.

The largest consumption increase in 2012 was for Italian-type cheeses, which were up 0.16 pounds per person to 13.22 pounds. Italian-type cheese consumption increased slightly, by 0.05 pounds to 14.93 pounds per person. Consumption of other than Italian or American cheeses increased by 0.04 pounds to 5.36 pounds per person.

The most consumed types of cheese in the U.S. are mozzarella and cheddar. Mozzarella cheese per capita consumption reached a new record high of 11.51 pounds in 2012; the previous record was 11.47 pounds per person set in 2011. Consumption of cheddar cheese declined for the third straight year; down 0.15 pounds or 1.6%.

Meanwhile, consumption of processed cheeses has been on a downward trend since peaking in 1996 at 8.76 pounds per person. The total for all processed cheeses decreased slightly by 0.14 pounds in 2012. However, this was only the third time that per capita consumption of processed cheese fell below 7 pounds in over 20 years.

Volume sales of natural cheese in U.S. reached approximately 3.034 billion pounds in 2012, with a value of over $14 billion dollars. The top three cheese types that accounted for the largest volume sales were Cheddar (25.5%), American (20.8%) and Mozzarella (15.6%). Together, these three account for over 60% of the volume sales of natural cheese. The top three also account for almost $8.0 billion dollars (57.1%) of the $14 billion dollars in sales.

U.S. sales of processed cheese products reached 811.8 million pounds in 2012, with a value of $3.0 billion dollars.

Did You Know?

  • The most popular cheese recipe is the United States is “macaroni and cheese.”
  • There are over 2,000 varieties of cheeses.
  • Cheese takes up about 1/10 the volume of the milk it was made from
  • A giant wheel of Cheddar cheese was given to Queen Victoria (1837-1901) for a wedding gift. It weighed over 1,000 pounds. A normal Cheddar wheel weighs 60-75 pounds.

Serving & Storage Tips

  • Unpasteurized cheese with a range of flavors should not be sliced until purchase otherwise it will start to lose its subtlety and aroma.
  • Keep the cheese in conditions in which it matures. Hard, semi-hard and semi-soft cheeses are stored in the temperatures from around 8 – 13 C.
  • Keep the cheese wrapped in the waxed paper and place it in a loose-fitting food-bag not to lose humidity and maintain the circulation of air.Wrap blue cheeses all over as mould spores spread readily not only to other cheeses but also to everything near.
  • Chilled cheeses should be taken out of the refrigerator one and a half or two hours before serving.
  • Cheeses contain living organisms that must not be cut off from air, yet it is important not to let a cheese dry out.
  • Do not store cheese with other strong-smelling foods. As a cheese breathes it will absorb other aromas and may spoil.
  • Wrap soft cheeses loosely. Use waxed or greaseproof paper rather than cling film.
  • Let cold cheese warm up for about half an hour before eating to allow the flavor and aroma to develop.

 

Courtesy: International Dairy Foods Association

The 2014 CFDA Fashion Awards Winners

JOSEPH ALTUZARRA NAMED WOMENSWEAR DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

RIHANNA NAMED FASHION ICON OF THE YEAR

AWARDS SHOW TO BE WEBCAST ON CFDA.COM ON TUESDAY, JUNE 3RD AT 11AM

House Photography:  BFA: www.bfanyc.com

Last night, the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) paid tribute to the winners and honorees of the 2014 CFDA Fashion Awards in collaboration with Swarovski at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center. Film director and screenwriter John Waters was the host for the evening. For the thirteenth year in a row, the evening was generously underwritten by Swarovski. Highlights of the evening included a live tribute featuring sixteen models of color in Diane von Furstenberg dresses paying homage to Founder’s Award honoree Bethann Hardison for advocating diversity on the runways and Michael Kors leading the In Memoriam segment in which he honored the passing of Annabel Tollman, L’Wren Scott, and Art Ortenberg over the past year.

2014 CFDA Fashion Awards - Award Presentation with hos John Waters

2014 CFDA Fashion Awards – Award Presentation with hos John Waters

Nominees, honorees, and winners were determined by the CFDA Awards Guild which is comprised of CFDA members, leading fashion journalists, stylists, and top retail executives. Ernst & Young, LLP was the official accounting firm of the Awards.

Tonight, we celebrated creativity, experience, and conviction by honoring the diversity and vibrancy of individuals who define the influence of the fashion industry,” said CFDA President Diane von Furstenberg.

ACCESSORIES WINNERS - THE ROWMARY - KATE OLSEN & ASHLEY OLSEN WITH PRESENTER KERI RUSSELL(Center)

ACCESSORIES WINNERS – THE ROWMARY – KATE OLSEN & ASHLEY OLSEN WITH PRESENTER KERI RUSSELL(Center)

Dao-Yi Chow, James Marsden, Maxwell Osborne

Dao-Yi Chow, James Marsden, Maxwell Osborne

Lupita Nyongo, Joseph Altuzarra

Lupita Nyongo, Joseph Altuzarra

The evening’s Womenswear Designer of the Year honors went to Joseph Altuzarra for Altuzarra, presented by Lupita Nyong’o. The award for Menswear Designer of the Year was presented to Maxwell Osborne & Dao-Yi Chow for Public School by actor James Marsden. Mary-Kate Olsen & Ashley Olsen for The Row took home the Accessories Designer of the Year Award, presented by actress Keri Russell.

Sebastian Stan, Christopher Peters, Nadja Swarovski, Shane Gabier, Greta Gerwig, Tim Coppens, Irene Neuwirth

Sebastian Stan, Christopher Peters, Nadja Swarovski, Shane Gabier, Greta Gerwig, Tim Coppens, Irene Neuwirth

Greta Gerwig and Sebastian Stan presented the three Swarovski Awards, which honor and recognize emerging talent. The Swarovski Award for Womenswear was given to Shane Gabier & Christopher Peters for Creatures of the Wind. The Swarovski Award for Menswear was presented to Tim Coppens. The Swarovski Award for Accessory Design went to Irene Neuwirth. Recipients in each category will receive generous financial support from the company as well as exposure to the company’s vast and innovative crystal products and applications for fashion.

[74070] RihannaonRedCarpet.jpg_low

Rihanna was presented with the Fashion Icon award by Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour who praised the musician for her ability to tell captivating stories through the boldness and beauty of clothes. Rihanna thanked members of the audience: “the designers, the models, and everyone else who has inspired me.

The CFDA believes in designers at every stage of their career.  Last night we recognized a broad range of talent and influence from student scholarship winners and emerging talent to industry icons,” added CFDA CEO Steven Kolb.

It’s been an honor to partner with the CFDA in celebrating the very best in American fashion for thirteen incredible years, and the creativity of the award winners never fails to amaze.  We are especially pleased to support the industry’s next generation through the Swarovski Awards. It’s a privilege to help these dazzling young talents evolve and realize their visions as they take the next steps in their careers,” said Nadja Swarovski, Member of the Swarovski Executive Board.

The Geoffrey Beene Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Tom Ford by Richard Buckley for his consistent, creative influence on fashion.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT HONOREE TOM FORD

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT HONOREE TOM FORD

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Florida’s The Oaks Club Receives Prestigious Distinguished Gold Club of the World Award

Award designates The Oaks Club as the first West Central Florida private club to receive this esteemed status

The Oaks Club today announced it has been awarded the prestigious Distinguished Gold Club of the World award (Residential Country Club category), a program conducted by BoardRoom magazine, one of the most respected trade publications serving private clubs.  Boardroom magazine developed the Distinguished Clubs award program to help vitalize and preserve the institution of private clubs by fostering a ceaseless drive to ever improve the “Member Experience” provided by private clubs throughout the world. For this survey, Distinguished Gold Club status was awarded to the top 10 percent of clubs, and the top 5 percent was awarded Distinguished Emerald Club status.

The Oaks Club (PRNewsFoto/The Oaks Club)

The Oaks Club (PRNewsFoto/The Oaks Club)

 

The Distinguished Clubs Award Program uses a club-specific rating system based on an extensive evaluation process that distills and measures a club’s member experience. To be designated a Distinguished Gold Club is to be one of a select group of private clubs that have been recognized as providing an absolutely excellent Member Experience. The distinction between a Distinguished Gold Club and a Distinguished Emerald Club is nuanced yet thoroughly recognizable, for it is based on the most important of all intangible qualities. Reputation. Reverence. Admiration. Brand Equity. Fame. Whatever you call it, it is that “X” factor that separates two clubs that both provide superlative Member Experience, but where one is a great club, while the other is the most prestigious of memberships.

(Left to right) The Oaks Club General Manager, Jeff Hartigan and Board of Governors President, John Bogatay (PRNewsFoto/The Oaks Club)

(Left to right) The Oaks Club General Manager, Jeff Hartigan and Board of Governors President, John Bogatay (PRNewsFoto/The Oaks Club)

(See he full list of 2014 Winners here: www.boardroommagazine.com/#!dc-gold/c1b1j)

As defined by Distinguished Clubs, “Member Experience” is that special combination of “Qualities” that a private club provides its members.  It is not just the quality of service, or of the facilities, or of the product provided, it is also the quality of the staff and of the management, as well as the overall club governance they deliver.  The most important quality, however, is the quality of the intangible.  While difficult to measure, the latter is comprised of those magic moments experienced, the members befriended, the memorable events and famous tournaments attended, as well as the club traditions, history, and heritage proudly recognized.

The Oaks Club is a private country club community developed on more than 1,000 acres situated on the east and west sides of U.S. 41 in Osprey, Florida, just 12 miles south of downtown Sarasota, with featured amenities including two championship golf courses, a 40,000-square-foot Georgian-style clubhouse with three restaurants, 12 Har-Tru tennis courts, pool complex, croquet, guest lodge and an active social calendar.

Wide Aerial Shot of The Oaks Club  Clubhouse (Courtesy of Allison Moore - Ward Group PR)

Wide Aerial Shot of The Oaks Club Clubhouse (Courtesy of Allison Moore – Ward Group PR)

“This honor showcases our member experience at the highest level.  We are the only club in West Central Florida with this designation and are extremely proud of the staff and leadership who are an integral part of our success,” said Jeff Hartigan, General Manager, The Oaks Club.  “This year marks our 30th anniversary and our membership is at an all-time high.”

Additionally, five department heads at The Oaks Club were awarded “Gold Distinguished Achievement in Leadership” winners.  They are: Susan Greene, Director of Membership and Marketing; Holly Caviglia, Director of Clubhouse Operations; Tim Beckwith, Director of Golf; Nick Kearns, Director of Green and Grounds; and Tom Whitten, Director of Tennis.

(See full list of Distinguished Achievement in Leadership winners here: www.boardroommagazine.com/#!dc-gold/c1b1j)

We’d like to congratulate The Oaks Club for earning Distinguished Gold Club status,” said John Fornaro, Publisher of BoardRoom magazine. “Special recognition also goes out to General Manger, Jeff Hartigan, as well as the club’s Board of Governors, its department heads, and entire staff for their efforts in providing an excellent member experience.”

Marriott International Celebrates 2014 Gay Pride Month and Inclusion with Powerful LGBT Portraits by Noted Photographer Braden Summers

Whoever You Are, Wherever You Go

Marriott International today launches #LoveTravels, a multicultural campaign that conveys the company’s commitment to make everyone feel comfortable being who they are, everywhere they travel. To bring #LoveTravels to life, Marriott has partnered with photographer Braden Summers to share exclusive and powerful images celebrating inclusion as part of its new Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) social media and marketing campaign. Summers’ unique ability to capture warmth and emotion perfectly communicates the company’s welcoming approach to hospitality.

LoveTravels family wrap LoveTravels Gina transgender model wrap

Classically trained in drawing and painting, photographer Summers uses his fine art sensibilities to compose photographs with elements and scenes that visually tell a story. Throughout the process he strives to inject inspiration into his narrative style. Whether shooting celebrities for the Tony Awards, or a lifestyle series of modern couples for the MoMA, his work remains instantly recognizable with his unique styled treatments.

Marriott International Celebrates Inclusion with Powerful LGBT Portraits by Noted Photographer Braden Summers.

Marriott International Celebrates Inclusion with Powerful LGBT Portraits by Noted Photographer Braden Summers.

 Marriott International Celebrates Inclusion with Powerful LGBT Portraits by Noted Photographer Braden Summers.

Marriott International Celebrates Inclusion with Powerful LGBT Portraits by Noted Photographer Braden Summers.

#LoveTravels features visually stunning images that will be displayed as building wraps at five hotels in Washington, D.C., a series of print ads in LGBT media, an online portrait gallery and display ads in cities throughout the U.S. A key element of the campaign includes portraits of Jason Collins, professional basketball player; Geena Rocero, fashion model and social advocate; and Talisha Padgett-Matthews, a Marriott associate. More about their inspiring stories and other images from the campaign can be found at LoveTravels.Marriott.com, including behind-the-scenes video. Continue reading