DARIA WERBOWY STARS IN MANGO’S FALL / WINTER 2014 CAMPAIGN

OPI SEPT 1

DARIA WERBOWY STARS IN MANGO’S FALL / WINTER 2014 CAMPAIGN marking her second consecutive season as the face of the Spanish retailer

Spanish retailer MANGO taps Canadian model Daria Werbowy as its campaign star for Fall/Winter 2014. This is Werbowy’s second consecutive season as the face of the brand—she previously starred in MANGO’s advertising campaign for Spring/Summer 2014. For FW14, Werbowy was shot by acclaimed photographer Josh Ollins in Montauk, NY. The campaign’s team of professionals included Shon and Lisa Butler who were responsible for responsible for hair and makeup, respectively. Additional campaign images will be released over the coming months.

DARIA WERBOWY STARS IN MANGO’S FALL / WINTER 2014 CAMPAIGN marking her second consecutive season as the face of the Spanish retailer.

DARIA WERBOWY STARS IN MANGO’S FALL / WINTER 2014 CAMPAIGN marking her second consecutive season as the face of the Spanish retailer.

DARIA WERBOWY STARS IN MANGO’S FALL / WINTER 2014 CAMPAIGN marking her second consecutive season as the face of the Spanish retailer

DARIA WERBOWY STARS IN MANGO’S FALL / WINTER 2014 CAMPAIGN marking her second consecutive season as the face of the Spanish retailer

MACY’S IMPULSE BRAND BAR III STEPS INTO SHOES FOR FALL 2014

Macy’s private brand bar III is stepping into new territory for Fall 2014 with the launch of bar III shoes for women. The collection makes its debut in August 2014 and will be sold exclusively at select Macy’s stores and on macys.com.

BAR III Shoe Launch + Fall 2014 Preview: Lily Lane, Julie Henderson

BAR III Shoe Launch + Fall 2014 Preview: Lily Lane, Julie Henderson

 

BAR III Shoe Launch + Fall 2014 Preview: Christina Caradona

BAR III Shoe Launch + Fall 2014 Preview: Christina Caradona

Staying true to the contemporary brand’s aesthetic, bar III shoes deliver versatile, fashion-forward footwear at an accessible price point. The debut collection consists of 17 styles priced from $49 to $199.

Much like the women’s ready-to-wear, the shoe collection offers something for nearly every occasion. Casual styles include the Berlinda, a flat sandal with chain detail for $49, the Zero, a bow-front ballet flat for $59, and the Susie, a Nubuck wedge sandal, available in four colors, for $79.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Dressier styles are priced from $79 to $99 and add a sophisticated edge to the collection. Standout styles include the Adalia, a lace up peep toe heel available in leopard calf hair or blue snakeskin-effect leather, and the Edith, a d’orsay pump with wraparound strap available in black leather, cordovan calf hair or leopard print calf hair.

The collection also features a large variety of booties and boots ideal for Fall’s cooler months. Heeled ankle boots like the sleek, pointed-toe Festa and sporty side-buckle Valerie range from $99 to $119, while taller styles like the Deidre riding boot and Cecile over-the-knee heeled boot are available from $129 to $199.

“We’re excited that the bar III customer can now dress in our brand from head to toe,” says Nancy Slavin, SVP Marketing at MMG. “The shoe collection is the perfect complement to our collection of ‘wear to work, wear out’ apparel and accessories, and we can’t wait to hear what our customers think.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Bar III, the Impulse department’s anchor brand, first launched its women’s and men’s fashion collections in February 2010. The brand has since expanded to include bar III home, a collection of bedding and decorative pillows launched in August 2011, and bar III jewelry, launched in November 2011. Now, with the addition of women’s shoes to the bar III family, consumers can achieve a truly “head-to-toe” bar III look.

 

 

Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire – Fall Exhibit at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Exhibition Dates: October 21, 2014–February 1, 2015
Exhibition Location: Anna Wintour Costume Center   

Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning AttireThe Costume Institute’s first fall exhibition in seven years, will be on view in The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Anna Wintour Costume Center from October 21, 2014 through February 1, 2015.  The exhibition will explore the aesthetic development and cultural implications of mourning fashions of the 19th and early 20th centuries.  Approximately 30 ensembles, many of which are being exhibited for the first time, will reveal the impact of high-fashion standards on the sartorial dictates of bereavement rituals as they evolved over a century.

Mourning Ensemble, 1870-1872, Black silk crape, black mousseline The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Martha Woodward Weber, 1930 (2009.300.633a,b) Veil, 1875, Black silk crape The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Roi White, 1984 (2009.300.633c)

Mourning Ensemble, 1870-1872, Black silk crape, black mousseline
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Martha Woodward Weber, 1930 (2009.300.633a,b)
Veil, 1875, Black silk crape
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Roi White, 1984 (2009.300.633c)

With the reopening of The Costume Institute space in May as the Anna Wintour Costume Center, the department returns to mounting two special exhibitions a year, to again include a fall show, in addition to the major spring exhibition.  This is the first fall exhibition The Costume Institute has organized since blog.mode: addressing fashion in 2007.

The predominantly black palette of mourning dramatizes the evolution of period silhouettes andthe increasing absorption of fashion ideals into this most codified of etiquettes,” said Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, who is curating the exhibition with Jessica Regan, Assistant Curator.  “The veiled widow could elicit sympathy as well as predatory male advances.  As a woman of sexual experience without marital constraints, she was often imagined as a potential threat to the social order.”

The thematic exhibition will be organized chronologically and feature mourning dress from 1815 to 1915, primarily from The Costume Institute’s collection.  The calendar of bereavement’s evolution and cultural implications will be illuminated through women’s clothing and accessories, showing the progression of appropriate fabrics from mourning crape to corded silks, and the later introduction of color with shades of gray and mauve.

“Elaborate standards of mourning set by royalty spread across class lines via fashion magazines,” said Ms. Regan, “and the prescribed clothing was readily available for purchase through mourning ‘warehouses’ that proliferated in European and American cities by mid-century.”

The Anna Wintour Costume Center’s Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery will orient visitors to the exhibition with fashion plates, jewelry, and accessories.  The main Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery will illustrate the evolution of mourning wear through high fashion silhouettes and will include mourning gowns worn by Queen Victoria and Queen Alexandra.  Examples of restrained simplicity will be shown alongside those with ostentatious ornamentation.  The predominantly black clothes will be set off against a stark white background and amplified with historic photographs and daguerreotypes.

The Museum’s website, www.metmuseum.org, will feature information on the exhibition and related programs.  Follow us on Facebook.com/metmuseumInstagram.com/metmuseum, andTwitter.com/metmuseum.

The Academy Brings Hollywood Costume To Iconic Wilshire May Company Building

EXPANDED FINAL TOUR OF COSTUME DESIGN EXHIBITION ARRIVES OCTOBER 2
Featuring costumes from The Hunger Games, Django Unchained, The Wizard of Oz and more

On view October 2, 2014 – March 2, 2015

This fall the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present the final showing of the groundbreaking multimedia exhibition Hollywood Costume in the historic Wilshire May Company building, the future location of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, at Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue in Los Angeles. Organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (V&A), this ticketed exhibition explores the central role of costume design – from the glamorous to the very subtle – as an essential tool of cinematic storytelling.

Dallas Buyers Club, 2013. Courtesy of Universal Studios Licensing LLC

Dallas Buyers Club, 2013. Courtesy of Universal Studios Licensing LLC

Mary Poppins, 1964. Courtesy of The Walt Disney Company

Mary Poppins, 1964. Courtesy of The Walt Disney Company

The Academy is enhancing the V&A’s exhibition and will include more than 145 costumes from over 60 lenders. The Academy’s presentation will add more than 30 costumes to this landmark show, including Jared Leto’s costume from Dallas Buyers Club (Kurt and Burt, 2013) – a recent acquisition to the Academy’s collection – as well as costumes from such recent releases as The Hunger Games (Judianna Makovsky, 2012), Django Unchained (Sharen Davis, 2012), Lee Daniels’ The Butler (RuthE. Carter, 2013), American Hustle (Michael Wilkinson2013) and The Great Gatsby (Catherine Martin, 2013). In addition, Hollywood Costume will showcase the Academy’s pair of the most famous shoes in the world – the original ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz(Adrian, 1939) shown with Dorothy’s blue and white gingham pinafore dress.

Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981. credit: Courtesy of Lucasfilm Ltd

Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981.
credit: Courtesy of Lucasfilm Ltd

Shakespeare in Love, 1998. credit: Courtesy of Miramax

Shakespeare in Love, 1998.
credit: Courtesy of Miramax

We are thrilled to bring this innovative exhibition to Los Angeles,” said Cheryl Boone Isaacs, Academy President. “Hollywood Costume invites visitors to see some of the most well-known costumes from their favorite movies and to explore the impact designers have in creating our most beloved characters.

Upending the conventions of what is considered “costume,” Hollywood Costumereveals what is hidden in plain sight: that films are about people, and the art of the costume designer helps create their characters. On view October 2, 2014, through March 2, 2015, the exhibition brings together iconic costumes from Hollywood’s Golden Age, including costumes for Marlene Dietrich from Morocco (1930) and Angel (1937) designed by Travis Banton, and from modern classics such as Mary Poppins (Tony Walton, 1964), Raiders of the Lost Ark (Deborah Nadoolman, 1981) and Titanic(Deborah L. Scott, 1997).

Hollywood Costume is curated by Deborah Nadoolman Landis, Academy Award®-nominated costume designer and founding director of UCLA’s David C. Copley Center for the Study of Costume Design, whose credits include National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Coming to America (1988) and the music video for Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” (1983); with Sir Christopher Frayling (Professor Emeritus of Cultural History, Royal College of Art), and set and costume designer and V&A Assistant Curator Keith Lodwick.

“Cinematic icons are born when the audience falls deeply in love with the people in the story. And that’s what movies and costume design are all about,” notes Landis.

Django Unchained, 2012. credit: Courtesy of Visiona Romantica, Inc., The Weinstein Company and Columbia Pictures

Django Unchained, 2012.
credit: Courtesy of Visiona Romantica, Inc., The Weinstein Company and Columbia Pictures

The exhibition is the culmination of a five-year effort to source, identify and secure objects from all over the world. The collectors who have loaned to the exhibition include major motion picture studios, costume houses, actors, public museums and archives, and private individuals.

EXHIBITION STRUCTURE
This innovative exhibition takes visitors on a non-chronological, four-gallery journey that tells the story of costume design from early Charlie Chaplin (The Tramp, 1912) to Man of Steel (James Acheson and Michael Wilkinson, 2013). Hollywood Costume includes montages, animation, film clips, and projections, supported by a specially commissioned score written by British composer Julian Scott. The clothes are exhibited alongside quotes and interviews with costume designers, directors, and actors discussing the role that costume plays in creating the characters on screen.

Act One: Deconstruction introduces the role of costume design in cinematic storytelling. This section explores the link between clothing and identity and how designers bring characters to life. Deconstruction features contemporary and period costumes from films including The Social Network (Jacqueline West, 2010), Dreamgirls(Sharen Davis, 2006), Fight Club (Michael Kaplan, 1999), The Addams Family (Ruth Myers, 1991), Dangerous Liaisons, (James Acheson, 1988), Barry Lyndon (Ulla-Britt Söderlund, Milena Canonero, 1975), The Virgin Queen (Charles LeMaire, Mary Wills, 1955) and Mildred Pierce (Milo Anderson, 1945). The costume designer’s research process is revealed using designs and sketches, costume fittings, budget breakdowns, and script pages with dialogue containing personality-defining clues.

Act Two: Dialogue examines the creative collaboration among great filmmakers, actors and costume designers. Using archival film footage as well as specially commissioned interviews, Dialogue explores five key director/designer pairings: Alfred Hitchcock and Edith Head, who worked together on 11 films including The Birds (1963); Tim Burton and Colleen Atwood, whose films together have spanned from Edward Scissorhands(1990) to Dark Shadows (2012); Martin Scorsese and Sandy Powell, who have teamed on films from Gangs of New York (2002) to The Wolf of Wall Street (2013); and Mike Nichols and Ann Roth, who have worked together for over 20 years on films fromSilkwood (1983) to Closer (2004). The Academy’s presentation of Hollywood Costumefeatures a new interview with writer-director Quentin Tarantino and costume designer Sharen Davis, who collaborated on Django Unchained (2012). This section also explores how costume designers have worked within the rapidly changing social and technological landscape of the last century: from silent to sound, from black and white to Technicolor, and from the studio system of Hollywood’s Golden Age to multi-national corporations and art house “indies.” Censorship, remakes and genre will be deconstructed in a section devoted to historic and social context. It will show how costume designers have embraced the innovations in technology and animation, such as Joanna Johnston’s design for the animated character Jessica Rabbit in Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), and the designs integrating motion-capture (“mo-cap”), exemplified by characters from Avatar (Mayes C. Rubio, Deborah L. Scott, 2009).

Act Three: Finale presents the most memorable and treasured costumes in cinema history, for Hollywood heroes, leading ladies, and femme fatales alike. They include those for Daniel Craig as James Bond in Casino Royale (Lindy Hemming, 2006) Marilyn Monroe as “The Girl” with the pleatedwhite halter dress in The Seven Year Itch (Travilla, 1955), Barbra Streisand as Fanny Brice in Funny Girl (Irene Sharaff, 1968) and Sharon Stone as Catherine Tramell in Basic Instinct (Ellen Mirojnick, 1992). Iconic fantasy, sci-fi, and superhero costumes will also be on view, from films including Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Jany Temime, 2009), The Twilight Saga: New Moon (Tish Monaghan, 2009), Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (April Ferry, 2003) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula(Eiko Ishioka, 1992). Finale explores how beloved characters continue to inspire film lovers, ignite fashion trends, and enrich international popular culture.

Titanic, 1997. credit: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox.

Titanic, 1997.
credit: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox.

Swarovski is the presenting sponsor of Hollywood Costume. The crystal house has provided the all-important sparkle to Hollywood’s wardrobes since the 1930s, when Swarovski crystals began to light up the silver screen in classic films like Gone with the WindGentlemen Prefer Blondes and Breakfast at Tiffany’s. In recent years, Swarovski has worked closely with talents in costume and set design on blockbusters includingBlack SwanSkyfall and The Great Gatsby, and its crystals have been the key creative ingredient in the dazzling set design for the Academy Awards since 2007.

“Swarovski’s history of working with costume, jewelry and set designers on some of Hollywood’s most iconic productions goes back 75 years to when Dorothy first tapped her Swarovski-encrusted ruby slippers,” said Nadja Swarovski, member of the Swarovski Executive Board, “so we’re thrilled to support this landmark exhibition at its new home in Los Angeles.”

Additional support is provided by Pirelli.

TICKETING
Tickets go on sale July 8, 2014 at www.oscars.org/HollywoodCostume. Advance booking advised.
Admission: $20 Adults ǀ $15 Seniors (62+) ǀ $10 for students with ID and children under 13.

Wilshire May Company building, 6067 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90036
Contact: 310-247-3049; HollywoodCostume@oscars.org

Continue reading

THE ACADEMY TO PREMIERE NEW DIGITAL RESTORATION OF 1934 BEST PICTURE “IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT”

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present the world premiere of the newly restored 1934 Best Picture winner “It Happened One Night,” a digital restoration in 4K by Sony Pictures Entertainment at Colorworks, on Saturday, July 19, at 7:30 p.m. at the Bing Theater on the LACMA campus.  The screening celebrates the 80th anniversary of the Frank Capra comedy classic, which was the first of only three movies in history to win Oscars® for Best Picture, Directing, Actor, Actress and Screenplay.

Frank Capra’s screwball comedy was the first film to receive Oscars for Best Picture, Actor, Actress, Directing and Writing – a feat not repeated until One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest four decades later. After they cross paths on a raucous interstate bus trip, spoiled runaway heiress Claudette Colbert and rogue newspaperman Clark Gable become a reluctant hitchhiking duo, and Gable’s iconic performance may have inspired not only Bugs Bunny’s carrot-eating routine but also a sartorial shift that made undershirts suddenly passé. Crackling with whip-smart dialogue about everything from doughnuts to “The Walls of Jericho,” Capra’s film delights in the charismatic rapport between Colbert and Gable. Throw in incomparable performances by a host of well-known character actors, and It Happened One Night remains fresh, funny and full of life some eighty years after it first delighted audiences.

Event Information

Saturday, July 19 at 7:30 p.m.
Bing Theater
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles

TICKETS
$5 general admission
$3 Academy members and students with a valid ID.

Tickets will be available Friday, June 27 at 10 am.
Order Tickets Online

The Word is Out: Lancôme Introduces NEW Grandiôse

Lancôme introduces Grandiôse: the First Ever Swan-NeckTMMascara for the Ultimate in LengthLift and Volume. Professional makeup artists bend mascara stems to coat every lash. With Grandiôse, Lancôme brings this expert application technique to women everywhere thanks to the world’s first Swan-NeckTM Wand.Curved at a 25 degree angle, the Swan-NeckTM Wand mimics the curves of your face, grabbing lashes at the base to fan them out and avoid any unnecessary smudging.

 Grandiôse: the First Ever Swan-NeckTM Mascara for the Ultimate in Length, Lift and Volume

Grandiôse: the First Ever Swan-NeckTM Mascara for the Ultimate in Length, Lift and Volume

The result? Ultimate Coverage – from corner to corner and root to tip. One more detail: the wand’s three dimensional curve seals air into the bottle and automatically mixes the formula in from the sides every time you open the bottle, so it always stays fresh.

Grandiôse: the First Ever Swan-NeckTMMascara ($32) will be available August 6, 2014 at Lancome.com and Lancôme counters nationwide.

AWARDS RULES APPROVED FOR 87TH OSCARS®

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences approved rules for the 87th Academy Awards® at their most recent Board meeting.  For the complete rules for the 87th Academy Awards, visit oscars.org/rules.

In the Acting categories, studios and production companies must now limit eligibility to a maximum of 10 actors and 10 actresses for each film, and must submit those names on the Official Screen Credits (OSC) form.  The Academy’s annual Reminder List of Eligible Releases will now list actors and actresses separately for each film.  Actors Branch voters would still make their own determinations about whether a performance should be considered under the Leading Role or Supporting Role category on their nominations ballots.

In the Animated Feature Film category, DVD screeners are now required as part of a film’s submission.

In the Documentary Feature category, films must now screen a minimum of four times daily during their qualifying theatrical releases in both New York and Los Angeles.  The screenings must begin between noon and 10 p.m., and at least one screening daily must begin between 6 p.m. and 10 p.m.

In the Music (Original Song) category, songwriters from established musical groups may now have the option to request that their song submission be considered under their group name.  If the request is approved and the song wins the Original Song award, the group would receive a single statuette.

In the Best Picture category, in determining the number of producers on a motion picture who are eligible for nomination, a two-person producing team shall be considered a single “producer” if the individuals have had an established producing partnership for at least the previous five years and have produced as a team at least two previous theatrically released feature films, instead of a minimum five theatrically released feature films.

A rule change in the Production Design category will allow the branch greater flexibility in recognizing the achievements of the principal artists responsible in creating the environment for the story.  When the environment of a film is substantially composed of animation and digital artistry, a digital artist who is primarily responsible for the achievement may now be considered for the Production Design award.  Previously, only “production designers,” “art directors” and “set decorators” were named as eligible for Awards recognition.

In the Animated Short Film and Live Action Short Film categories, films that have received prior nontheatrical public exhibition or distribution may now qualify for Academy Awards consideration by winning a festival award on the Short Films Qualifying Festival List. Without a festival win, the nontheatrical distribution prior to a theatrical release would still disqualify a short film’s eligibility.

For the first time, the Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal award-winning films in the Alternative, Animation, Narrative and Foreign Film categories at the 2014 Student Academy Awards will all be eligible for Oscar® consideration in the Short Film categories.  Similarly, the Gold, Silver and Bronze winners in the Documentary category at the 2014 Student Academy Awards will be eligible for consideration in the Documentary Short Subject category.

Other adjustments to the rules include standard date changes and other “housekeeping” adjustments.

Rules are reviewed annually by individual branch and category committees.  The Awards Rules Committee then reviews all proposed changes before presenting its recommendations to the Academy’s Board of Governors for approval.

The Academy also has launched its new Awards Submissions platform for entering information required for Academy Awards consideration.  This replaces the Academy’s previous submissions site for feature films, and now includes the ability to submit online for the Animated Feature Film category.  Submitting individuals are encouraged to register now at submissions.oscars.org.  The deadline for submitting OSC forms for the 87th Academy Awards is 5 p.m. PT on Wednesday, December 3, 2014.

The 87th Academy Awards will be held on Sunday, February 22, 2015, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live by the ABC Television Network.  The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.